Platonismus und Christentum

Ihre Beziehungen und deren Grenzen

Platonismus und Christentum

Eve-Marie Becker und Holger Strutwolf, Mohr Siebeck: Tübingen, 2022

Description

The present volume explores the relationship between Platonism and Christianity in late antiquity with regard to concept of God, world formation, creation, providence, and freedom. The contributions by Christoph Markschies, Holger Strutwolf, Christian Pietsch, and Alfons Fürst were presented at a colloquium on the occasion of Barbara Aland’s eighty-fifth birthday and are collected in the present volume together with a reply by the jubilarian and a short introduction by Eve-Marie Becker.

Table of contents

Eve-Marie Becker Platonismus und Christentum. Ihre Beziehungen und deren Grenzen Zur Einführung in diesen Band  p. 1

Christoph Markschies ἦν ποτε ὅτε οὐκ ἦν oder: Schwierigkeiten bei der Beschreibung dessen, was vor aller Zeit war . 11 Holger Strutwolf Ewige Zeugung. Die Paradoxie des absoluten Ursprungs im Neuplatonismus und im christlichen Denken, p. 41

Christian Pietsch Providenz. Getaufter Platonismus am Beispiel von Augustins De Genesi ad litteram, p. 69

Alfons Fürst Freiheit in der römischen Kaiserzeit – platonisch und christlich, p. 89

Barbara Aland Platonismus und Christentum. Ihre Beziehungen und deren Grenzen Ein persönlicher Dank und eine Antwort, p. 121

Indices, p.137

1. Personenregister, p. 137

2. Sachregister, p. 139

Link

https://www.mohrsiebeck.com/en/book/platonismus-und-christentum-9783161618086?no_cache=1

Anpof 

Rede Brasileira de Mulheres Filósofas

Descrição e organização

Lutar contra o preconceito acadêmico, dar visibilidade à obra de filósofas, discutir questões de feminismo e gênero e, principalmente, fazer filosofia: esses são os nossos interesses. Formamos um coletivo de profissionais brasileiros engajados em projetos sobre filosofia e mulheres

(Texto dos organizadores)

Link

https://www.filosofas.org/

LEM/ EPHE

Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité Tardive

Mai 2023

Description et organisation

Vendredi 26 mai 2023, 16h-18h15, via Zoom.

La vie intellectuelle de la fin de l’Antiquité est caractérisée par un fort intérêt porté aux « principes » (archai) : principes de la réalité, principes du monde, principes de la connaissance. Quelle que soit la façon dont on regroupe les intellectuels de la fin de l’Antiquité – polythéistes ou chrétiens, philosophes ou théologiens −, tous parlent, explicitement ou implicitement, des principes. Certains cherchent même activement à déterminer ce que sont les principes (par ex., Origène, Plotin, Porphyre, Damascius, les gnostiques, les Hermétistes, les théurgistes). Cette recherche est pour eux capitale, afin d’établir la manière dont la réalité est structurée, de réfléchir à la place des êtres humains dans le monde et aux puissances qui affectent leur vie, de penser dans quelle mesure nous sommes libres, comment nous pouvons atteindre la connaissance, ainsi qu’obtenir le bonheur ou le salut. La recherche des principes (métaphysiques ou théologiques) est ainsi un thème important en lui-même et pour la formation éthique. Le Programme des rencontres 2022-2023 du projet de recherche Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive propose d’explorer cette thématique des « principes » (archai) dans le monde intellectuel de la fin de l’Antiquité. Il examinera différentes questions, telles que : comment les principes disent la réalité, comment ils expliquent les relations entre les mondes divin et humain et dans quelle mesure le bonheur et le salut sont possibles pour les humains étant donné la structure de la réalité.

Programme

Is Matter a Principle? Christian Authors from Hermogenes to Origen

Lenka Karfikova (Charles University Prague) :

Our study attempts to map the ideas of matter in the Christian authors of the 2nd- 3rd centuries (Hermogenes, Tatian, Theophilus of Antioch, Clement of Alexandria, Origen), which by no means included only the idea of “creation out of nothing” as it eventually became established for a long time.

The Critique of the Chaldean Oracles in the Anonymous Commentary on Plato’s ‘Parmenides’

Stefan Marinca (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) :

The so-called Anonymous Commentary on Plato’s ‘Parmenides’ often shows a strong polemical spirit. This applies especially to the fourth fragment of the Commentary (fol. IX–X) where the possibility of knowing the First Principle is debated, questioning at least two schools of thought: on the one hand, the Stoics and on the other hand, an “unnamed group of interpreters” of the Chaldean Oracles. My presentation examines the passage that recalls the Chaldean Oracles from two perspectives. After reviewing some hypotheses about the identity of these “unnamed interpreters” and the originality of their thesis, I will turn to the response of the commentator, who criticizes both the form of their transmission (by means of a revelation) and the doctrine itself. The second point of view is related to a formal and objective matter: the “unnamed interpreters” of the Oracles claim that the Father “unifies in his simplicity” his own Power and Intellect. This phrase is also found in the ‘common source’ used by the Latin theologian Marius Victorinus and the Coptic-Gnostic apocalypse Zostrianos (NHC VIII,1), although here it indicates how the One is configured according to the triad Existence-Life-Blessedness. The final part of my presentation examines some hypotheses concerning the presence of this formula in both the Anonymous Commentary and the ‘common source’, by making some references to the anti-Gnostic debate promoted by the school of Plotinus.

Contact

Projet pluriannel de recherches dirigé par Luciana Soares Santoprete, Anna Van den Kerchove, George Karamanolis, Éric Crégheur et Dylan Burns.

The zoom link for each conference will be sent the week before to all those who have already registered last year.

For those who are not yet in our mailing list, to receive the zoom link of the conferences, please send a message to sympa@services.cnrs.fr from the address you want to subscribe to the list.

In the subject line of your message, type in: subscribe lesplatonismes

Leave the message body blank. You will receive a confirmation e-mail.

Lien

https://cnrs.academia.edu/LucianaGabrielaSoaresSantoprete

https://lem-umr8584.cnrs.fr/?Luciana-Gabriela-Soares-Santoprete

LEM/ EPHE

Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité Tardive

Avril 2023

Description et organisation

Vendredi 14 avril 2023, 16h-18h15, via Zoom.

La vie intellectuelle de la fin de l’Antiquité est caractérisée par un fort intérêt porté aux « principes » (archai) : principes de la réalité, principes du monde, principes de la connaissance. Quelle que soit la façon dont on regroupe les intellectuels de la fin de l’Antiquité – polythéistes ou chrétiens, philosophes ou théologiens −, tous parlent, explicitement ou implicitement, des principes. Certains cherchent même activement à déterminer ce que sont les principes (par ex., Origène, Plotin, Porphyre, Damascius, les gnostiques, les Hermétistes, les théurgistes). Cette recherche est pour eux capitale, afin d’établir la manière dont la réalité est structurée, de réfléchir à la place des êtres humains dans le monde et aux puissances qui affectent leur vie, de penser dans quelle mesure nous sommes libres, comment nous pouvons atteindre la connaissance, ainsi qu’obtenir le bonheur ou le salut. La recherche des principes (métaphysiques ou théologiques) est ainsi un thème important en lui-même et pour la formation éthique. Le Programme des rencontres 2022-2023 du projet de recherche Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive propose d’explorer cette thématique des « principes » (archai) dans le monde intellectuel de la fin de l’Antiquité. Il examinera différentes questions, telles que : comment les principes disent la réalité, comment ils expliquent les relations entre les mondes divin et humain et dans quelle mesure le bonheur et le salut sont possibles pour les humains étant donné la structure de la réalité.

Programme

Middle Platonic Theories of Principles and the Valentinian Grande Notice in Irenaeus of Lyon

Christoph Markschies (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin – Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften) :

In Irenaeus’ Adversus Haereses an extoteric sketch of a group of so called “Valentinian Gnostics” is preserved, probably not written by Ptolemy, a freelanced Christian teacher in Rome, but by one or some of his pupils. This sketch contains a theory of principles (in the form of a myth which one can compare to myths in Platonic texts. After having discussed the question which esoteric theory of principles is behind the esoteric myth we will discuss the question how this “Valentinian” theory of principles is related to contemporary Middle Platonic theories. We will observe a certain tendency of these Christians to demonstrate their independence and at the same time an interest to recognized by Platonists as part of a contemporary dialogue on principals.

Harmonics, Theurgy and Syncretism in the De Nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii of Martianus Capella

Jay Bregman (University of Maine) 

In his Neoplatonic allegory of the ascent of the human soul to the noetic realm, The Marriage of Philology and Mercury, Martianus Capella follows the polyvalent allegorical principles of Porphyry and the Theurgic Neoplatonists for whom gods and myths, disturbing on the surface, esoterically represent noetic forms and processes. Mercury and Philology symbolize the divine and human intellect and their marriage. Martianus uniquely applies Greek harmonic principles and intervals to the steps of Philology’s ascent through the spheres. The “natural music” in the
grove of Apollo suggests the theurgic presence of the god. Harmony’s discourse on Greek music covers the modes and categories of Greek music. Martianus allegorical principles accord with the emperor Julian’s theology. His use of musical principles displays his grasp of theurgic and harmonic principles.

Contact

Projet pluriannuel de recherches dirigé par Luciana Soares Santoprete, Anna Van den Kerchove, George Karamanolis, Éric Crégheur et Dylan Burns.

The zoom link for each conference will be sent the week before to all those who have already registered last year. For those who are not yet in our mailing list, to receive the zoom link of the conferences, please send a message to sympa@services.cnrs.fr from the address you want to subscribe to the list. In the subject line of your message, type in: subscribe lesplatonismes. Leave the message body blank. You will receive a confirmation e-mail.

Lien

https://cnrs.academia.edu/LucianaGabrielaSoaresSantoprete

https://lem-umr8584.cnrs.fr/?Luciana-Gabriela-Soares-Santoprete

LEM/ EPHE

Les platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive

Février 2023

 

Description et organisation

Vendredi 10 février 2023, 16h-18h15, via Zoom.

La vie intellectuelle de la fin de l’Antiquité est caractérisée par un fort intérêt porté aux « principes » (archai) : principes de la réalité, principes du monde, principes de la connaissance. Quelle que soit la façon dont on regroupe les intellectuels de la fin de l’Antiquité – polythéistes ou chrétiens, philosophes ou théologiens −, tous parlent, explicitement ou implicitement, des principes. Certains cherchent même activement à déterminer ce que sont les principes (par ex., Origène, Plotin, Porphyre, Damascius, les gnostiques, les Hermétistes, les théurgistes). Cette recherche est pour eux capitale, afin d’établir la manière dont la réalité est structurée, de réfléchir à la place des êtres humains dans le monde et aux puissances qui affectent leur vie, de penser dans quelle mesure nous sommes libres, comment nous pouvons atteindre la connaissance, ainsi qu’obtenir le bonheur ou le salut. La recherche des principes (métaphysiques ou théologiques) est ainsi un thème important en lui-même et pour la formation éthique. Le Programme des rencontres 2022-2023 du projet de recherche Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive propose d’explorer cette thématique des « principes » (archai) dans le monde intellectuel de la fin de l’Antiquité. Il examinera différentes questions, telles que : comment les principes disent la réalité, comment ils expliquent les relations entre les mondes divin et humain et dans quelle mesure le bonheur et le salut sont possibles pour les humains étant donné la structure de la réalité.

Programme

Principia in the Rhetoric, Biblical Exegesis, and Trinitarian Theology of Marius Victorinus

Stephen Cooper (Franklin & Marshall College) 

The surviving writings of Marius Victorinus, both those covering the areas of his professional pre-Christian activity as a rhetor as well his post-conversion works, all mention the principia of the objects of his authorial concerns: rhetoric, dialectic, theology, and the Christian life. While it is with slight exception only his trinitarian treatises that explicitly discuss principia in the ontological or metaphysical sense, all of his works show a distinct inclination to express what comes first — in argumentation, in knowledge, and in reality — as a necessary step to grasping the consequences relative to each sphere of inquiry or action. This paper will survey his writings for their various usages of the term principium (and related vocabulary), with the goal of ascertaining how his articulation of the principia of rhetoric, dialectical argumentation, trinitarian theology, and Christian ethics reveals his philosophical sources, his theological commitments, and his aims as an author.

Le nombre comme ἀρχή dans le monde latin des IV– Ve siècles

Beatrice Bakhouche (Université de Montpellier) :
Ἀρχή est généralement rendu en latin par les termes initium ou principium, qui peuvent recouvrir des réalités fort différentes. Le nombre en est l’une d’elles et sa déclinaison, sur le plan philosophique comme religieux, est plus fréquente qu’on ne pourrait le croire, car les grands auteurs des IVe-Ve siècles en font tous état. Je me propose d’aborder, dans le cadre de cette communication, les passages les plus significatifs d’auteurs comme Calcidius, Macrobe, Martianus Capella ou Favonius Eulogius, en essayant d’en dégager le sens, les nuances d’un auteur à l’autre et, s’il se peut, l’origine.

Contact

Projet pluriannel de recherches dirigé par Luciana Gabriela Soares Santoprete, Anna Van den Kerchove, George Karamanolis, Éric Crégheur et Dylan Burns.

The zoom link for each conference will be sent the week before to all those who have already registered last year.
For those who are not yet in our mailing list, to receive the zoom link of the conferences, please send a message to sympa@services.cnrs.fr from the address you want to subscribe to the list. In the subject line of your message, type in: subscribe lesplatonismes. Leave the message body blank. You will receive a confirmation e-mail.

Lien

https://platonismes.huma-num.fr

https://cnrs.academia.edu/LucianaGabrielaSoaresSantoprete

https://lem-umr8584.cnrs.fr/?Luciana-Gabriela-Soares-Santoprete

LEM/ EPHE

Les platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive

Décembre 2022

Description et organisation

Vendredi, 9 décembre 2022, 9h-11h15, via Zoom.

La vie intellectuelle de la fin de l’Antiquité est caractérisée par un fort intérêt porté aux « principes » (archai) : principes de la réalité, principes du monde, principes de la connaissance. Quelle que soit la façon dont on regroupe les intellectuels de la fin de l’Antiquité – polythéistes ou chrétiens, philosophes ou théologiens −, tous parlent, explicitement ou implicitement, des principes. Certains cherchent même activement à déterminer ce que sont les principes (par ex., Origène, Plotin, Porphyre, Damascius, les gnostiques, les Hermétistes, les théurgistes). Cette recherche est pour eux capitale, afin d’établir la manière dont la réalité est structurée, de réfléchir à la place des êtres humains dans le monde et aux puissances qui affectent leur vie, de penser dans quelle mesure nous sommes libres, comment nous pouvons atteindre la connaissance, ainsi qu’obtenir le bonheur ou le salut. La recherche des principes (métaphysiques ou théologiques) est ainsi un thème important en lui-même et pour la formation éthique. Le Programme des rencontres 2022-2023 du projet de recherche Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive propose d’explorer cette thématique des « principes » (archai) dans le monde intellectuel de la fin de l’Antiquité. Il examinera différentes questions, telles que : comment les principes disent la réalité, comment ils expliquent les relations entre les mondes divin et humain et dans quelle mesure le bonheur et le salut sont possibles pour les humains étant donné la structure de la réalité.

Programme

Contesting the Three-Principle Systems of the Refutation of All Heresies (Elenchos)

David Litwa (Australian Catholic University)

Since the 1960s, scholars have been accustomed to categorize several groups of the Sondergut in the Refutation of All Heresies as “three-principle systems.” These groups include the Naassenes, Peratai, Simonians, Sethians, Doketai, and Monoimus. The purpose of this paper is to show how this classification generally reinscribes the heresiological tendencies of the author of the Refutation. I offer a fresh reading of these Sondergut sources with an eye to their variety and the specifics of their theology. In the end, although scholars can fruitfully speak of “principles” when referring to the theology of these groups, the principles were not always or even frequently triadic.

Une aporie contre les gnostiques ? La tension entre les principes éthico-cosmologiques chez Plotin et ses implications antignostiques

Camille Guigon (Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3) 

Dans les traités 6 (IV, 8) et 10 (V, 1), Plotin se confronte à un problème redoutable à la fois pour son système et pour la pensée platonicienne en général : l’âme vient-elle dans un corps pour une raison éthique ou pour une raison cosmologique ? Dans le cas de l’éthique, l’âme descend dans le corps car elle est incapable de maintenir sa contemplation des formes intelligibles. Mais dans le cas de la cosmologie, l’âme vient dans le sensible car elle doit animer les corps et faire naître les espèces vivantes déjà présentes dans l’intelligible. Si Platon ne traite pas ces questions, Plotin tente de les résoudre. Or, il ne parvient pas à atteindre son objectif. C’est dans le cadre de cet échec qu’interviennent ses adversaires gnostiques. Dans cette présentation, nous montrerons que les textes gnostiques qui nous sont parvenus, apportent des solutions efficaces à la tension entre les principes éthico-cosmologiques, ce que Plotin ne parvient pas à faire. Celui-ci va cependant riposter, en particulier dans le Traité 33 (II, 9), en faisant de cette tension, qu’il ne résout pas, une arme. Paradoxalement, c’est parce qu’il est bien plus respectueux de Platon que les gnostiques qu’il conserve l’aporie. Afin de démontrer comment Plotin a utilisé l’aporie éthico-cosmologique contre les gnostiques, nous montrerons d’abord qu’il a échoué à la résoudre. Puis nous donnerons un aperçu de la réponse gnostique à ce problème et enfin, nous verrons comment Plotin insère l’aporie dans son argumentation philosophique contre les gnostiques.

Contact

Projet pluriannel de recherches dirigé par Luciana Soares Santoprete, Anna Van den Kerchove, George Karamanolis, Éric Crégheur et Dylan Burns.

The zoom link for each conference will be sent the week before to all those who have already registered last year.

For those who are not yet in our mailing list, to receive the zoom link of the conferences, please send a message to sympa@services.cnrs.fr from the address you want to subscribe to the list.

In the subject line of your message, type in: subscribe lesplatonismes.

Leave the message body blank. You will receive a confirmation e-mail.

Lien

https://cnrs.academia.edu/LucianaGabrielaSoaresSantoprete

https://lem-umr8584.cnrs.fr/?Luciana-Gabriela-Soares-Santoprete

LEM/ EPHE

Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité Tardive

Octobre 2022

Description et organisation

Vendredi 21 octobre 2022, 16h-18h15, via Zoom.

La vie intellectuelle de la fin de l’Antiquité est caractérisée par un fort intérêt porté aux « principes » (archai) : principes de la réalité, principes du monde, principes de la connaissance. Quelle que soit la façon dont on regroupe les intellectuels de la fin de l’Antiquité – polythéistes ou chrétiens, philosophes ou théologiens −, tous parlent, explicitement ou implicitement, des principes. Certains cherchent même activement à déterminer ce que sont les principes (par ex., Origène, Plotin, Porphyre, Damascius, les gnostiques, les Hermétistes, les théurgistes). Cette recherche est pour eux capitale, afin d’établir la manière dont la réalité est structurée, de réfléchir à la place des êtres humains dans le monde et aux puissances qui affectent leur vie, de penser dans quelle mesure nous sommes libres, comment nous pouvons atteindre la connaissance, ainsi qu’obtenir le bonheur ou le salut. La recherche des principes (métaphysiques ou théologiques) est ainsi un thème important en lui-même et pour la formation éthique. Le Programme des rencontres 2022-2023 du projet de recherche Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive propose d’explorer cette thématique des « principes » (archai) dans le monde intellectuel de la fin de l’Antiquité. Il examinera différentes questions, telles que : comment les principes disent la réalité, comment ils expliquent les relations entre les mondes divin et humain et dans quelle mesure le bonheur et le salut sont possibles pour les humains étant donné la structure de la réalité.

Programme

The “Archaeology” of Gnosis: On the Inner Life of the Gnostic First Principle

Zlatko Plese (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
My talk examines various Gnostic responses to one of the central issues of metaphysical monism: the emergence of reality from a self-contained unitary first principle. In addition to the imagery of plenitude, overflow, and self-extension, Gnostic traditions consistently deploy the analogy with human cognitive processes to account for the passage from initial unity to plurality: they describe the unfathomable first principle as a self-searching absolute which, in the process of its gradual self-actualization, experiences the same series of changing dispositions and affections as the mind of the developing human. Contrary to Plotinus’ assertion that “when speaking of the One, we actually speak of our own experiences” (Enn. VI.9 [9] 49-54), Gnostic traditions propose exactly the opposite: when speaking of ourselves and our dispositions and experiences, we actually speak of the One.

First Principles on Classic Gnostic Texts and Plotinus

Tuomas Rasimus (University of Helsinki)
My paper discusses the ways key classic gnostic texts (Eugnostos, the source behind Irenaeus’ AH 1.30, Apocryphon of John, Zostrianos and Allogenes) explain the generation of first principles. I argue that these texts make use of established Neopythagorean solutions of monistic derivation (by self-duplication, self-division, or exteriorization) but combine them with biblical speculations about the image and likeness of God. In doing so, the gnostic authors came up with creative solutions and set vocabulary that foreshadowed Plotinus’ procession-and-return scheme, including the famous being-life-mind triad (as well as its variant, the existence-life-blessedness triad). We know from Porphyry’s biography that Plotinus had gnostic friends and that Greek versions of Zostrianos and Allogenes circulated in Plotinus’ seminars. I aim to show that Plotinus was influenced by his gnostic friends but modified their solutions to be compatible with Plato (Sophist 248e in particular). The influence was probably mutual and would explain the full-blown Neoplatonism of Zostrianos and Allogenes.

Contact

Projet pluriannuel de recherches dirigé par Luciana Soares Santoprete, Anna Van den Kerchove, George Karamanolis, Éric Crégheur et Dylan Burns.

The zoom link for each conference will be sent the week before to all those who have already registered last year. For those who are not yet in our mailing list, to receive the zoom link of the conferences, please send a message to sympa@services.cnrs.fr from the address you want to subscribe to the list. In the subject line of your message, type in: subscribe lesplatonismes. Leave the message body blank. You will receive a confirmation e-mail.

Lien

https://cnrs.academia.edu/LucianaGabrielaSoaresSantoprete

https://lem-umr8584.cnrs.fr/?Luciana-Gabriela-Soares-Santoprete

LEM/EPHE

Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité Tardive

Cycle de conférences 2022-2023

Description et organisation

La vie intellectuelle de la fin de l’Antiquité est caractérisée par un fort intérêt porté aux « principes » (archai) : principes de la réalité, principes du monde, principes de la connaissance. Quelle que soit la façon dont on regroupe les intellectuels de la fin de l’Antiquité – polythéistes ou chrétiens, philosophes ou théologiens −, tous parlent, explicitement ou implicitement, des principes. Certains cherchent même activement à déterminer ce que sont les principes (par ex., Origène, Plotin, Porphyre, Damascius, les gnostiques, les Hermétistes, les théurgistes). Cette recherche est pour eux capitale, afin d’établir la manière dont la réalité est structurée, de réfléchir à la place des êtres humains dans le monde et aux puissances qui affectent leur vie, de penser dans quelle mesure nous sommes libres, comment nous pouvons atteindre la connaissance, ainsi qu’obtenir le bonheur ou le salut. La recherche des principes (métaphysiques ou théologiques) est ainsi un thème important en lui-même et pour la formation éthique. Le Programme des rencontres 2022-2023 du projet de recherche Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive propose d’explorer cette thématique des « principes » (archai) dans le monde intellectuel de la fin de l’Antiquité. Il examinera différentes questions, telles que : comment les principes disent la réalité, comment ils expliquent les relations entre les mondes divin et humain et dans quelle mesure le bonheur et le salut sont possibles pour les humains étant donné la structure de la réalité.

English version

The intellectual life of late antiquity is characterized by a strong concern with principles (archai): principles of reality, principles of the world, principles of knowledge. Regardless of how one groups intellectuals in late antiquity— into pagans and Christians, philosophers and theologians—they all speak about principles explicitly or implicitly and some of them actively seek to establish what the principles are (e.g., Plotinus, Porphyry, Origen, Damascius, Gnostics, Hermeticists, theurgists). They clearly deem the project of principles to be crucial for establishing how reality is structured, what the place of humans in the world is, what powers affect our lives, how free are we, how we can attain knowledge, and how we can attain happiness or salvation. The search for principles (understood as metaphysical or theological) is then an important issue both of itself and also for shaping ethics. The series of talks in the academic year 2022-2023 of the research project The Platonisms of the Late Antiquity will explore this topic of “principles” (archai) in its broad application in the intellectual world of late antiquity and will examine questions such as how principles account for reality, how principles explain the interaction between the divine and the human world, and how human happiness and salvation is possible given the structure of reality.

Versão em português

O projeto de pesquisa « Platonismes de l’Antiquité Tardive : interactions philosophiques et religieuses » (Platonismos da Antiguidade Tardia: interações filosóficas e religiosas) tem por objetivo criar um espaço de encontro regular permitindo a colaboração de pesquisadores e pesquisadoras trabalhando nas áreas de história da filosofia e história das religiões. Esse projeto visa estudar as trocas entre os pensamentos filosóficos, filosófico-religiosos e religiosos da época do Império romano e da Antiguidade tardia a fim de melhor compreender tanto seu impacto sobre a emergência e a construção das filosofias neoplatônicas, quanto identificar as fontes filosóficas dos textos gnósticos, herméticos e dos Oráculos caldeus. Trata-se da continuação de um projeto colaborativo precedente, « Plotin et les gnostiques » (Plotino e os gnósticos), alargando o seu campo de pesquisa quanto à cronologia (antes e depois de Plotino) e quanto aos corpus estudados (médio platonismo, hermetismo, etc.), e está em ligação direta com a temática da base de dados https://platonismes.huma-num.fr/

Contact

Projet pluriannel de recherches dirigé par Luciana Soares Santoprete, Anna Van den Kerchove, George Karamanolis, Éric Crégheur et Dylan Burns / Research project directed by Luciana Gabriela Soares Santoprete, Anna Van den Kerchove, George Karamanolis, Éric Crégheur and Dylan Burns.

 

Pour obtenir le lien zoom, envoyez un message à sympa@services.cnrs.fr ;

Écrire dans l’objet du message : subscribe lesplatonismes

Laisser le corps du message vide.

Vous recevrez un mail de confirmation

 

To obtain the link zoom, send a message to sympa@services.cnrs.fr

Write in message subject : subscribe lesplatonismes

Leave the message body blank.

You will receive a confirmation by mail.

 

Lien

https://cnrs.academia.edu/LucianaGabrielaSoaresSantoprete

https://lem-umr8584.cnrs.fr/?Luciana-Gabriela-Soares-Santoprete

The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy

Cover for The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy

David Konstan, Myrto Garani, and Gretchen Reydams-Schils, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2023

Description

Several decades of scholarship have demonstrated that Roman thinkers developed in new and stimulating directions the systems of thought they inherited from the Greeks, and that, taken together, they offer many perspectives that are of philosophical interest in their own right. The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy explores a range of such Roman philosophical perspectives through thirty-four newly commissioned essays. Where Roman philosophy has long been considered a mere extension of Hellenistic systems of thought, this volume moves beyond the search for sources and parallels and situates Roman philosophy in its distinctive cultural context.

The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy emphasizes four features of Roman philosophy: aspects of translation, social context, philosophical import, and literary style. The authors adopt an inclusive approach, treating not just systematic thinkers such as Cicero and Augustine, but also poets and historians. Topics covered include ethnicity, cultural identity, literary originality, the environment, Roman philosophical figures, epistemology, and ethics.

(Text by the publisher)

Table of contents

Introduction, David KonstanMyrto Garani, and Gretchen Reydams-Schils
Part I. The Roman Philosopher: Affiliation, Identity, Self, and Other
1. Pythagoreans and Samnite philosopher, Phillip Horky
2. Epicurean Orthodoxy and Innovation: from Lucretius to Diogenes Oenoanda, Pamela Gordon
3. Epicureans and Stoics in Augustan Poetry, Gregson Davis
4. Seneca and Stoic Moral Psychology, Gretchen Reydams-Schils
5. Marcus Aurelius and the Tradition of Spiritual Exercises, John Sellars
6. Apuleius and Roman Demonology, Jeffrey Ulrich
7. Philosophers and Roman Friendship, David Konstan
8. The Ethics and Politics of Property, Malcolm Schofield
Part II. Writing and Arguing Roman Philosophy
9. Lucretius, Tim O’Keefe
10. Dialogue before and after Cicero, Matthew Fox
11. The Stoic Lesson: Cornutus and Epictetus, Michael Erler
12. Persius’ Paradoxes, Aaron Kachuck
13. Plutarch’s Platonism, George Karamanolis
14. Parrhêsia: Dio, Diatribe, and Philosophical Oratory, Dana Fields
15. Philosophical Therapy: Consolation in Roman Philosophy, James Ker
16. ‘We’ thinking: Cicero’s Academic Arguments, Orazio Cappello
17. Stoic Poetics, Claudia Wiener
Part III. Inside and Outside of Roman Philosophy
18. Translation, Christina Hoenig
19. Politics, Ermanno Malaspina and Elisa Della Calce
20. Rhetoric, Erik Gunderson
21. The Subject at its Limits, James I. Porter
22. Medicine, David Leith
23. Sex, Kurt Lampe
24. Time, Duncan Kennedy
25. Death, James Warren
26. Environment, Daniel Bertoni
Part IV. After Roman Philosophy: Transmission and Impact
27. Roman Pre-Socratics: Lucretius to Diogenes Laërtius, Myrto Garani
28. Reading Aristotle at Rome, Myrto Hatzimichali
29. Christian Ethics: The Reception of Cicero in Ambrose’s De officiis, Ivor Davidson
30. Recovering Platonism: Plotinus and Augustine, Anne-Isabelle Bouton-Touboulic
31. Byzantine Political Thought: Roman Concepts in Greek Disguise, Anthony Kaldellis
32. Latin Neoplatonism: the Medieval Period, Agnieska Kijewska
33. Transmitting Roman Philosophy: the Renaissance, Quinn Griffin
34. Nature, Anthropology, and Politics: the Enlightenment, Natania Meeker

Link

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-oxford-handbook-of-roman-philosophy-9780199328383?cc=fr&lang=en&#

Faculty of Theology – University of Oslo

APOCRYPHA

Storyworlds in Transition: Coptic Apocrypha

in Changing Contexts in the Byzantine and Early Islamic Periods

Description and organization

This project studies Coptic apocrypha as transnarrative, transmedial, and transauthorial products of Egyptian, especially monastic, Christianity. The project approaches the material using theories and methods inspired by a combination of material philology, literary and media studies perspectives, and cognitive science. In contrast with common and traditional approaches to apocrypha, this project treats Coptic apocrypha, without chronological boundaries, as major contributors to dynamic and ongoing processes of world-building, extending and developing the Christian storyworld in ways that were profoundly coupled with, and which had important ramifications for, the beliefs and practices of Egyptian Christians over a thousand-year period stretching from late antique and Byzantine times until the early Islamic period, thus spanning the entire period of Coptic literary production.

(Texte by the organizers)

Link

https://www.tf.uio.no/english/research/projects/apocrypha/