Society for Classical Studies

Allegory, Poetics, and Symbol in Neoplatonic Texts

Description and organization

What is the origin and purport of the idea of the symbol in Neoplatonic poetic theory? What role does allegory play in strategies of Neoplatonic exegesis, either of Plato’s texts or of other canonical or scriptural texts? How do Neoplatonists deploy theories of allegory, analogy, and symbolism to approach traditional texts? 

 

From Plato’s dialogues, to Middle Platonist treatments of those dialogues (e.g., Apuleius’ Golden Ass; Origen’s exegesis of the Phaedrus in the Contra Celsum) to the full-blown Neoplatonic theories of allegory we find in Proclus’ Commentary on the Republic, to later Renaissance uses of symbols and emblems (e.g. Bruno’s imprese in On the Heroic Frenzies), symbolism is a key component of Platonic discourse. What roles do the language of symbol, theories of symbolism, and or other aesthetic approaches to textuality play in the Platonic traditions? How do Neoplatonists apply the category of symbol to registers that are other than literary (as in for example in theurgy)? 

 

Since Sheppard’s 1976 Oxford dissertation, Studies on the 5th and 6th essays of Proclus’ Commentary on the Republic, scholarly interest in Neoplatonic allegory and poetics has increased. Not only is the first volume of the new Cambridge translation of Proclus’ Commentary on the Republic (Edited and translated by Baltzly, Finamore and Miles) about to appear, but now classics volumes such as Lamberton’s Homer the Theologian (Brill 1989) Dawson’s, Allegorical Readers and Cultural Revision in Ancient Alexandria (California 1991) and Struck’s Birth of the Symbol (Princeton 2004)have sponsored an increasingly important field that spans ancient philosophy, poetics, biblical studies, Patristics, and ancient religion. 

 

In this CFP we invite scholars interested in the history, theory, philosophy, and trajectory of symbolism and poetics as they appear in Platonizing texts to submit abstracts of 500–800 words, for papers requiring 15-20 minutes of presentation, electronically to Sara Ahbel-Rappe. The member’s name should appear only on the cover letter, not on the abstract. All abstracts must be received no later than February 24, 2018. Abstracts will be judged anonymously. The panel organizer will subsequently contact those who have written abstracts with the reviewers’ comments and recommendation.

Contact

rappe@umich.edu

(Text by the organizers)

Link

https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/2019/150/call-abstracts-allegory-poetics-and-symbol-neoplatonic-texts

University of Reading

LGBT+ Classics: Teaching, Research, and Activism

 

Description and organization

Organised by: Katherine Harloe, Talitha Kearey, and Irene Salvo

The Women’s Classical Committee UK is organising a one-day workshop on Classics and Queer studies to highlight current projects and activities that embrace the intersections of research, teaching, public engagement, and activism.

The day will feature a series of talks and a roundtable bringing together academics in Classics (and related fields), LGBT+ activists, museum curators and those working in other areas of outreach and public engagement. We intend to explore how LGBT+ themes are included in Classics curricula; how public engagement with queer Classics and history of sexualities can contribute to fight homophobia and transphobia; and the ways in which the boundaries between research, teaching, and activism can be crossed. The roundtable will focus in particular on strategies of support for LGBT+ students and staff, current policies in Higher Education, and what still needs to be improved. Confirmed speakers include: Beth Asbury, Clara Barker, Alan Greaves, Jennifer Grove, Rebecca Langlands, Sebastian Matzner, Cheryl Morgan, and Maria Moscati. Jennifer Ingleheart (Durham University) will deliver the keynote address ‘Queer Classics: sexuality, scholarship, and the personal’.

We are also reserving time during the day’s schedule for a series of short (five-minute) spotlight talks by delegates. Through this session, we hope to provide a chance for delegates to share research projects, teaching programmes, and experiences related to LGBT+ issues. We are particularly interested in spotlight talks on:

– new queer and gender-informed work in classics, ancient history, archaeology, papyrology, philosophy, or classical reception;

– fresh ideas on teaching the history of queerness through texts and material culture;

– the difficulties and discriminatory experiences encountered by members of staff, undergraduate and postgraduate students, and early-career researchers, because of their gender identity and/or sexual orientation.

If you would like more information or to volunteer to give one of these talks, please e-mail Irene Salvo, LBGT+ liaison officer, salvoirene@gmail.com. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday 5th December 2017.

People of any gender expression or identity who support the WCC’s aims are welcome to attend this event. For further details, see our website at http://wcc-uk.blogs.sas.ac.uk/about-us/.

Attendance is free for WCC UK members, £10 for non-members (to cover catering costs). You can join the WCC UK here https://wcc-uk.blogs.sas.ac.uk/about-us/join-us/ (and if you’re a student, underemployed, or unemployed, membership is only £5). As with all WCC events, travel bursaries will be available for students and the un/under-employed.

The WCC is committed to providing friendly and accessible environments for its events, so please do get in touch if you have any access, dietary, or childcare inquiries. For a full statement of the WCC’s childcare policy please see here https://wcc-uk.blogs.sas.ac.uk/events/.   

Programme

09.45 – Registration desk opens

10.15 – Welcome and Introduction, with a message from Deborah Kamen (Seattle), Co-Chair of the Lambda Classical Caucus

10.30 – Sebastian Matzner (KCL, London): Queer Connections: Classics and the Gay Science

10.55 – Beth Asbury, Jozie Kettle, Clara Barker (Oxford): Out in Oxford: Hidden Stories in Plain Sight

11.30 – Coffee break

11.45 – Spotlight Talks

Alan Greaves (Liverpool): Transgender Lives in Classics: An Example of Museum-based Learning
Kate Nichols (Birmingham): Working with Students to Queer University Collections
Rebecca Mellor (York): Queer There and Everywhere
Chris Mowat (Newcastle): The Place of Classics in LGBT Public History
Mara Gold (Oxford): Beyond Sappho: Classics and the Development of Modern Lesbian Culture
Jessica Moody (Birkbeck): Lesbian Hellenism? How Fin de Siècle Female Classicists Challenged our Queer Histories

13.00 – Lunch

14.00 – Jen Grove and Rebecca Langlands (Exeter): Ancient Artefacts and Sex Education: Exploring Gender and Sexual Diversity with the University of Exeter’s “Sex & History” project

14.35 – Cheryl Morgan (co-chair of OutStories Bristol): How Not to Erase Trans History

15.00 – Nicki Ward (Birmingham): Sharing Good Practice: A Model for Embedding LGBTQ Inclusivity in the Curriculum.

15.25 – Maria Moscati (Sussex): Starting as Researcher and Becoming an Activist

15.50 – Coffee break

16.05 –  Round table on policies and support strategies with Clara Barker (Oxford), Simon Chandler-Wilde (Reading), Alyssa Henley (SupportU), Alan Greaves (Liverpool) and Jessica Moody (ECU).

16.35 – Concluding discussion

17.15 – Keynote address by Jennifer Ingleheart (Durham):Queer Classics: Sexuality, Scholarship, and the Personal18.15 – Drinks reception

Contact

salvoirene@gmail.com.

(Text by the organizers)

Link

https://wcc-uk.blogs.sas.ac.uk/events/

Universität Wien

Two Myths and two Languages

Pagans and Christians in Late Antique Poetry

Programme

THURSDAY, 7.12. University of Vienna, Marietta Blau-Saal

14:00-14:30 Opening Ceremony Michael Zach Vice Dean of the Faculty of Philological and Cultural Studies Christine Ratkowitsch Head of Department Herbert Bannert

Chair: Laura Gianvittorio

14.30-15:00 Domenico Accorinti Pagan and Christian Astral Imagery in Late Antique Poetry

15:00-15:30 Kurt Smolak Pagane und christliche Caritas. Martin und der Bettler im literarischen Kontext

15:30-16:00 COFFEEBREAK

16:00-17:00 Nicole Kröll Reshaping Iliad and Odyssey. The Cyclopes in Nonnus’ Dionysiaca Presentation of the Proceedings of the Nonnus-Conference, Vienna 2013

17:00-18:00 BUFFET

FRIDAY, 8.12. University of Vienna, Institute for Classical Philology, Medieval and Neo-Latin Studies, Lecture Room

Chair: Stefan Büttner

9:30-10:00 Kristoffel Demoen Presentation of the Project „Database of Byzantine Book Epigrams“ (DBBE

10:00-10:30 Delphine Lauritzen Two Hymns for one Poem. Beyond Pagan vs Christian in John of Gaza’s Ekphrasis

10:30-11:00 COFFEEBREAK

11:00-11:30 Ursula Gärtner Ekphrastisches Erzählen bei Quintus Smyrnaeus

11:30-12:00 Andreas Rhoby Frühbyzantinische inschriftliche Epigramme. Form und Funktion

12:00-15:00 LUNCH

Chair: Kurt Smolak

15:00-15:30 Kristoffel Demoen Gregory of Nazianzus on his Verses. An ars poetica?

15:30-16:00 Jan Stenger „Beim Häuten der Zwiebel.“ Gregory of Nazianzus’ De vita sua as autofiction

16:00-16:30 COFFEEBREAK

16:30-17:00 Berenice Verhelst The narrator as exegete. A Narratological Analysis of Speech Introductions in Nonnus’ Paraphrase

17:00-17:30 Filip Doroszewski Citizens of Heaven. Jesus and the New Political Identity in Nonnus’ Paraphrase

17:30-18:00 David Hernández de la Fuente Pagan Wrongdoers and Christian Sinners. Darkness, Evil and Repentance in Nonnus

19:00 DINNER

SATURDAY, 9.12. University of Vienna, Institute for Classical Philology, Medieval and Neo-Latin Studies, Lecture Room

Chair: Herbert Bannert

10:00-10:30 Mary Whitby Nonnos on Elephants

10:30-11:00 Karin Schlapbach Dance and Death in Nonnus’ Dionysiaka

11:00-11:30 COFFEEBREAK

11:30-12:00 Frederick Lauritzen Late Antique Philosophy in the Poetry of George of Pisidia

12:00-12:30 Calum Alasdair Maciver Greek Imperial Poetry and the Latin Question, Again

12:30-13:00 Final discussion – Round table

13:00-14:00 BUFFET

16:00 EXCURSION Papyrussammlung der Nationalbibliothek

(Text by the organizers) 

Link https://www.academia.edu/35069859/Citizens_of_Heaven._Jesus_and_the_New_Political_Identity_in_Nonnus_Paraphrase_Two_Myths_and_two_Languages_Pagans_and_Christians_in_Late_Antique_Poetry_Vienna_7-9_Dec_2017_

Universität Marburg

Griechische biologische Literatur in der Kaiserzeit:

Formen, Funktionen und Probleme

Beschreibung und Organization

Referierende/Beteiligte

Dominik Berrens (Innsbruck), Diego De Brasi (Marburg), Sabine Föllinger (Marburg), Francesco Fronterotta (Rom), Jim Hankinson (Austin), Katarzyna Jazdzewska (Warschau), Emily Kneebone (Cambridge), Claudia Lo Casto (Salerno), Steven D. Smith (New York), Laurence Totelin (Cardiff), Athanassios Vergados (Newcastle upon Tyne), James Wilberding (Bochum)

Weitere Informationen

Aristoteles und seine Schüler gelten bekanntlich als Gründer der antiken Biologie. Doch bereits in hellenistischer Zeit nahm das Interesse an empirischer Forschung aristotelico more und an theoretischem biologischem Wissen ab. Diese Tendenz setzte sich in der Kaiserzeit fort, wobei biologische Fachkenntnisse, die auf den Forschungen des Peripatos basierten und mittels im Hellenismus redigierter Auszugssammlungen weitergereicht wurden, in andere literarische Gattungen mit unterschiedlichen Zielsetzungen aufgenommen wurden. Ins Zentrum der Bestrebungen der Autoren rückten oft die Interessen des anvisierten Publikums, so dass Aspekte wie Unterhaltung, Sammlung außergewöhnlicher Phänomene, Allgemeinbildung und philosophische Erbauung die Umfunktionierung des Wissens leiteten. Insofern lässt sich die Bezeichnung ‚biologische Literatur‘ auf eine Vielfalt von Textsorten der Kaiserzeit anwenden, die vom philosophischen Dialog über die Buntschriftstellerei bis hin zum Lehrgedicht und zur christlichen Paränese reichen. Auch im medizinischen Bereich (z.B. bei Galen und in pharmakologischen Traktaten) wurde biologisches Fachwissen intensiv rezipiert.

Die vom Seminar für Klassische Philologie der Universität Marburg (Dr. Diego De Brasi) in Kooperation mit der Universität La Sapienza in Rom (Prof. Dr. Francesco Fronterotta) organisierte interdisziplinäre Tagung will in erster Linie auf die Verquickung von literarischen Formen und philosophischen Positionen in dieser Literatur fokussieren und eine Analyse der Formen und Funktionen biologischer Literatur bzw. biologischen Wissens in der Kaiserzeit bieten.

Die Tagung findet vom 07. bis zum 09.12.2017 statt. Weitere Informationen entnehmen Sie, bitte, dem Programm, das hier zum Download bereitsteht:

Tagungsprogramm

Donnerstag, 07.12.2017, Alter Senatssaal, Biegenstraße 10

14.00–14.15 Uhr

Grußworte

Elisabeth Rieken, Prodekanin des FB 10: Fremdsprachliche Philologien Einführung

Diego De Brasi, Francesco Fronterotta

14.15–16.00 Uhr

Moderation: Diego De Brasi (Marburg)

Animal Communication in Imperial Greek Literature – Emily Kneebone (Cambridge)

„οὐδὲν γὰρ οὕτω µικρὸν ἡ φύσις ἔχει µειζόνων καὶ καλλιόνων κάτοπτρον“ (Plut. De soll. an. 11, 967 D) – Soziale Insekten in der griechischen Literatur der Kaiserzeit – Dominik Berrens (Innsbruck)

16.00–16.30 Uhr Kaffeepause / Coffee break

16.30–18.15 Uhr

Moderation: Brigitte Kappl (Marburg)

Aelian’s Fabulous Trees – Laurence Totelin (Cardiff)

Recapitulation Theory and Transcendental Morphology in Antiquity – James Wilberding (Bochum)

Besuch des Marburger Weihnachtsmarktes und Aperitif für die Referenten im Weinlädele

Freitag, 08.12.2017, Forschungszentrum Deutscher Sprachatlas, Raum 001

10.30–12.15 Uhr

Moderation: Angela Ulacco (Freiburg i.B.)

Biological Metaphor and Cosmology: The Refusal of Plato’s Artificialism between Middle-Platonism and Plotinus – Francesco Fronterotta (Rom)

Biologia e vita nella filosofia di Plotino – Claudia Lo Casto (Salerno)

12.15–16.00 Uhr

Mittagessen / Lunch break Altstadtführung

16.00–17.45 Uhr

Moderation: Francesco Fronterotta (Rom)

‘Paradeigmatic’ Zoology: Philo of Alexandria, Plutarch, Aelian, and ‚Physiologus‘ – Katarzyna Jażdżewska (Warschau)

Biologie und Theologie: Zoologische Systematik im Hexaemeron des Basilius von Caesarea – Sabine Föllinger (Marburg)

17.45–18.30 Uhr: Kaffeepause / Coffee break

Keynote

18.30 Uhr

Moderation: Sabine Föllinger (Marburg)

A Hymn to Nature: Structure, Function and Design in Galen’s Biology – Jim Hankinson (Austin, TX)

Abendessen der Referenten im Restaurant „Hostaria del Castello“

Samstag, 09.12.2017, Forschungszentrum Deutscher Sprachatlas, Raum 001

09.30–11.15 Uhr

Moderation: Tim Whitmarsh (Cambridge)

A Question of Breeding: Aelian, Aristotle, and Alexander in India (Ael. NA 8.1) – Steven D. Smith (New York)

Etymologische Namenserklärungen in Oppians Halieutika – Athanassios Vergados (Newcastle upon Tyne)

11.15–11.45 Uhr Kaffeepause / Coffee break

11.45–12.30 Uhr

Biologie zwischen Wissensvermittlung und ethischer Paränese: der Physiologos – Diego De Brasi (Marburg)

Kontakt

Alter Senatssaal, Biegenstraße 10 und Forschungszentrum Deutscher Sprachatlas, Raum 001

debrasi@staff.uni-marburg.de

(Text der Veranstalter)

Link

https://www.uni-marburg.de/de

Utrecht University

Olympiodorus of Alexandria

Exegete, teacher, philosopher

Description and organization

Olympiodorus of Alexandria, who is often considered to have been the last leading, non-Christian philosopher of classical antiquity, has also been termed ‘the first classicist’ (Tarrant, 1997). His place in the history of thought brings into focus issues of doctrinal difference and toleration, of the value of philosophical tradition, and of pedagogical concern for those coming of age in uncertain times. But there is more to Olympiodorus than the times in which he lived. His commentaries on Plato’s First Alcibiades, Gorgias and Phaedo, and on Aristotle’s Categories and Meteorology are now becoming better known and explored. Recent scholarship has also reopened the question of Olympiodorus’ philosophical calibre. There is reason enough, then, to try to present an all-round picture of Olympiodorus, as this conference intends to do.

Programme

Thursday December 14th                   

9.30-10.00       Coffee and Registration

10.00-10.15     Opening

10.15-11.00     Danielle Layne (Gonzaga) – The Virtue of Double Ignorance in Olympiodorus

11.00-11.15     Break

11.15-12.00     Albert Joosse (Utrecht) – Knowing Oneself in Olympiodorus

12.00-12.45     Pauliina Remes (Uppsala) – Olympiodorus on the Human Being

12.45-14.00     Lunch

14.00-14.45  Maria Chriti (Thessaloniki/CHS)  – Olympiodorus of Alexandria on ‘Composition’ in Language and Thinking  after Ammonius of Hermeias and John Philoponus

14.45-15.30     Bettina Bohle (Bochum) – Olympiodorus and Hermeias on the Platonic Theory of Rhetoric

15.30-16.00     Break

16.00-16.45     François Renaud (Moncton) – Reconciling Philosophy with Poetry: Olympiodorus’ Interpretation of the Gorgias Myth

16.45-17.30     Anne Sheppard (Royal Holloway) – Olympiodorus on Drama

Friday December 15th            

9.30-10.15       Cristina Viano (Paris, CNRS) – Olympiodore, le commentaire des Météorologiques et l’alchimie gréco-alexandrine

10.15-10.30     Break

10.30-11.15     Simon Fortier (Liège) – Olympiodorus and the Teaching of Transmigration

11.15-12.00     Péter Lautner (Budapest) – Olympiodorus’ Notion of aesthêsis and its Context

12.00-13.30     Lunch

13.30-14.15     Sonsoles Costero Quiroga (Madrid) – Scala virtutum in Proclus and Olympiodorus. Two Different Views about Grades of Knowledge in Late Neoplatonism

14.15-15.00     Michael Griffin (UBC) – Olympiodorus on the Scale of Virtues

15.00-15.15     Break

15.15-16.00     Harold Tarrant (Newcastle, Australia) – Special Kinds of Platonic Discourse: Does Olympiodorus Have a New Approach?

16.00-16.30     Closing discussion

All welcome. Please register by December 1st via olympiodorus2017@gmail.com

This conference is made possible by financial support from the Dutch Research Council (NWO), through the VENI project ‘Socratic Educations’.

Contact

olympiodorus2017@gmail.com

(Text by the organizers)

Link

https://www.uu.nl/staff/lajoosse

Université de Lausanne

Couple relationships in antiquity

Looking for real-life experiences

Description and organization

Organizer: Claude-Emmanuelle Centlivres Challet; Anne Bielman Sánchez; Charlotte Golay

The topic of the conference is the quest for real-life experiences of ordinary couples in Greco-Roman antiquity. The couples studied are heterosexual adults belonging to lower and middle classes as well as to civic elites. Hellenistic queens and kings, Republican triumvirs, Roman emperors and members of the imperial family will not be considered. The conference hopes to examine male-female relationships in synchronic and diachronic ways, and seeks to glimpse the various ways the real-life experiences of couples is expressed in literary, epigraphical, papyrological, and iconographical sources from the 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD.

Keynote speakers : Bonnie MacLachlan (UWO), Amy Richlin (UCLA)

Topics include, but are not limited to:

– affective bonds and the dynamic of emotions within the couple

– the distribution of daily public and private chores

– the dynamic of couple relationships depending on socio-economic status – realism and idealisation of couple relationships depending on the genre of the sources

This conference is part of a three-year research project (2016-2019) funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation, the aim of which is to study and compare the functioning of ordinary and exceptional couples in Greco-Roman antiquity (https://www.unil.ch/iasa/projetcoupleen). A conference on exceptional couples – in which one of the partners was a head of state – took place on the 9th and 10th of November 2017 in Lausanne.

We invite the submission of abstracts of 300 words or less, to be sent by the 22th of January to claude-emmanuelle.centlivreschallet@unil.ch

Programme

Jeudi 8 novembre 2018 Le vécu des couples ordinaires dans l’Antiquité

8:45 Thé/café

9:00 Accueil

9:15 Keynote B. MACLACHLAN (University of Western Ontario) Mind the gap: evidence (?) for non-elite couples in the Hellenistic period

10:15 Pause

10:45 A.-S. VALTADOROU (University of Edinburgh) Athenian couples and erotic love: an examination of male-female relationships through vase-paintings associated with marriage ceremonies

11:15 J. PORTER (University of Nottingham) Reconstructing the everyday lives and strategies of an independent slave couple in Menander’s Epitrepontes

11:45 Ch. GOLAY (Université de Lausanne) Le vécu des couples dans les épigrammes funéraires hellénistiques

12:15 Repas

14:15 R. FALLAS (Open University) The tale of two couples: infertility and marriage in antiquity

14:45 M. PARCA (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Ordinary couples in Greek papyri

15:15 C. TOSI (Università degli Studi di Ferrara) Te volo, uxor, conloqui. Family routines in Plautine comedies

15:45 Pause 16:15 J. FABRE-SERRIS (Université de Lille) Modèles littéraires et sociaux à l’épreuve du réel : l’amour conjugal selon Ovide dans les Tristes et les Pontiques

16:45 I. G. MASTROROSA (Università degli Studi di Firenze) « Unis pour le meilleur et le pire » : les relations conjugales des écrivains au premier siècle de l’Empire

17:15 Pause et présentation des posters

17:45 Discussions

19:00 Repas des orateurs, oratrices et organisatrices (sur le campus)

Vendredi 9 novembre 2018 Le vécu des couples ordinaires dans l’Antiquité

8:45 Thé/café

9:00 Keynote A. RICHLIN (University of California Los Angeles) Mixed marriages in the Roman Empire

10:00 Pause

10:30 M. HARLOW & L. LARSSON LOVÉN (University of Leicester/University of Gothenburg) Ordinary Roman couples in text and image

11:00 J. HALLETT (University of Maryland) Vilicus and vilica in De Agri Cultura: the elder Cato’s script for a farming couple

11:30 K. K. HERSCH (Temple University) Worth her weight: coupling and eating in Petronius’ Satyrica

12:00 Repas

13:30 M. CARUCCI (Independent researcher) At home with the Baker and his Wife: the couple that is meant to be?

14:00 M. THOMA (University of Athens) Material aspects of marriage: economic transactions between spouses in Roman Egypt

14:30 N. ZWINGMANN (Independent researcher) On the way – Roman magistrates and their wives travelling to and in the provinces

15:00 Pause

15:30 C. CASPERS (Murmellius Gymnasium, Alkmaar) What a girl wants: female subjectivity, sexuality and couplehood in the postclassical Graeco-Roman world

16:00 G. NATHAN (San Diego Mesa College and University of New South Wales) A reconsideration of Augustine of Hippo’s relationship with his unnamed concubine

16:30 Pause

17:00 Discussion générale

19:30 Repas des orateurs, oratrices et organisatrices (en ville)

Contact

emmanuelle.centlivreschallet@unil.ch

(Text by the organizers)

Link

https://www.unil.ch/iasa/projetcoupleen

European Association for the Study of Religions (EASR)

Multiple Religious Identities

Individuals, Communities, Traditions

Description and organization

As empirical realities, religions are never homogenous. From the multitude of beliefs, objects, feelings, discourses and practices of everyday lived religion, to major historical disputes that have led to the formation of different schools or movements, to conflict-laden divisions at the intersection of religion and politics, an extraordinary variety of contexts and content constitute the ubiquitous constant of religions across centuries and cultures from early civilisations to the immigrant societies of the 21st century, across Europe and beyond. The multiplicity of ways in which individuals form relationships with religious traditions and the plural modes of how religious codes are appropriated add further complexity to this picture.

It comes, therefore, as no surprise that plurality and its more normative pendant, pluralism, have always constituted key issues in religious identity debates: for instance, when religious diversity is set against claims of authenticity and orthodoxy with the discourse on conversion as an example. Plurality and pluralism are also at the core of political controversies, e.g., in discussions on social norms and alleged deviance on religious grounds.

Even though historical and contemporary research has drawn attention to the religious diversity within societies, the conceptualisation and theorisation of these issues remain difficult, given the inner plurality of religions and the multiple constructions of religious identities.

Key concepts such as world religions or syncretism have been the subject of severe criticism. This stemmed from more fundamental questions concerning the homogenising effect of conceptual frameworks that are based, for instance, on a distinction between dominating and minority traditions. Thus, an uncomfortable choice seems necessary: Do we let go our theoretical endeavour in favour of the multitude of individual cases or do we blur the manifold individual and social realities of religions through our generalising concepts? Building on this constructive tension, this conference aims to provide a forum for historical and contemporary research as well as conceptual, methodological and theoretical reflections on the plurality and multiplicity of both religions and religious identities. Topics may include the following:

  • self-conceptions and identity discourses within religious communities and traditions
  • multiple religious belongings in the past and the present
  • conversion and the handling of converts
  • debates on orthodoxy and heterodoxy, conformity and non-conformity
  • missionary activities and religious exclusiveness
  • normative concepts of plurality
  • historical regulation of religious diversity
  • the plurality of ritual practices
  • secularity, secularities and forms of non-belief
  • conceptual and theoretical reflections on terms and models

⇒ Submit your proposal now!

For all information and questions regarding the EASR 2018 Conference, please contact the coordinator of the conference using the contact form below or mail or call directly:

Programme

Saturday, 16 June 14:30–18:00 IAHR Executive Committee Meeting F0071

Sunday, 17 June

9:00–14:00 EASR Executive Committee Meeting F005

13:00–15:00 IAHR Executive Committee Meeting F007

15:00–16:00 Registration / Welcome Coffee vonRoll, 001

16:00–17:00 Opening Event vonRoll, 001

17:00–18:00 Keynote 1: Reinhard Schulze The ambiguity of the religious self in pre- and postnational social worlds. Examples from 17th-century Morocco and 20th-century Germany vonRoll, 001 18:00–19:00 Welcome Reception vonRoll, 001

Monday, 18 June

9:00–10:30 Slot 1 Room S104-A: Conceptual and theoretical reflections on terms and models I F007

S15-A: Ernesto De Martinoʹs Multiple Identities: Between Coherence and Contradiction

I F023 S16-A: Multi-faith places and urban religious diversity

I F-122 S18-A: Divided or Disjointed Belonging in a Polytheistic Environment

I F-106 S20: Religion as political opposition

F-121 S27-A: Multiple Religious Identities in Late Antiquity – with a focus on the individual

I F006 S38-A: Multiple religious identities in Japan

I F013 S42-A: Self-conceptions and identity discourses within religious communities and traditions

I F-113 S43-A: Contrasting religious multiple identities: efforts to mark orthodoxies and differences in complex societies

I F005 S50-A: Who Are the ‘Nones’ in Europe?

I F022 S7-A: Gendered eco-spirituality: conceptual reflections

I F-112 S71: Religious education in Russia in post-secular context

F-107 S75: Re-configuring core concepts of the Study of Religions? – More than 30 years after the ‘cultural turn’

F021 S96-A: Multiple religious belongings in the past and the present

I F012 S97-A: Conversion and the handling of converts I F-111

10:30–11:00 ¤ Coffee Break ¤

11:00–12:00 Keynote 2: Grace Davie Multiple Religious Identities: Realities and Reflections UniS, A 003

12:00–13:30 ¤ Lunch ¤

13:30–15:00 Slot 2

S1-A: Multiple religious and secular identities in the public school I: The representation of religion in school: developments in different contexts F021 S104-B: Conceptual and theoretical reflections on terms and models II F007 S12-A: Wild and Monstrous Identities – Religious Identity Formation and Natural Spaces in Ancient Religions I F011 S15-B: Ernesto De Martinoʹs Multiple Identities: Between Coherence and Contradiction II F023 S16-B: Multi-faith places and urban religious diversity II F-107 S18-B: Divided or Disjointed Belonging in a Polytheistic Environment II F-106 S27-B: Multiple Religious Identities in Late Antiquity – with a focus on the individual II F006 S28-A: Prayer, pop and politics: researching religious youth in migration society I F-105 S35: Religion, co-imagining and controversial relationships F-121 S38-B: Multiple religious identities in Japan II F013 S40: Late Antique Geographies of Heresiology: Fashioning Local Orthodoxies in early Christianity and Manichaeism F-123 S42-B: Self-conceptions and identity discourses within religious communities and traditions II F-113 S43-B: Contrasting religious multiple identities: efforts to mark orthodoxies and differences in complex societies II F005 S50-B: Who Are the ‘Nones’ in Europe? II F022 S7-B: Gendered eco-spirituality: conceptual reflections II F-112 S80: “Islamic radicalisation” and extremism from a study of religions perspective F-122 S96-B: Multiple religious belongings in the past and the present II F012 S97-B: Conversion and the handling of converts II F-111

15:00–15:30 ¤ Coffee Break ¤

15:30–17:00 Slot 3

S1-B: Multiple religious and secular identities in the public school II: The relationship between RE and religious and secular belonging F021 S104-C: Conceptual and theoretical reflections on terms and models III F007 S12-B: Wild and Monstrous Identities – Religious Identity Formation and Natural Spaces in Ancient Religions II F011 S16-C: Multi-faith places and urban religious diversity III F013 S27-C: Multiple Religious Identities in Late Antiquity – with a focus on the individual III F006 S28-B: Prayer, pop and politics: researching religious youth in migration society II F-105 S36: Alternative Religious Belongings in the Communist Regime Countries up to 1990 F022 S41: Metropolitan Religion Speakers F023 S42-C: Self-conceptions and identity discourses within religious communities and traditions III F-113 S6-A: Norms and Normativity in the Study of Religion I F-123 S63: Convenience or Conversion? An exploration of collaborative method in material religion F-107 S64: Comparison as Method and Topic in the History of Religion F00S76: Indigenous Religion(s). Local Grounds, Global Networks F-111 S8: Multiple Religious Identities in Late Antique Egypt (2nd–6th Centuries) F-122 S82: Researching Popular Culture and Religion. Discourses, Negotiations, and Reception F-121 S96-C: Multiple religious belongings in the past and the present III F012

17:15–18:15 Keynote 3: Milda Ališauskienė Diversification of Religious Identities in Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe: the case of the Baltic States UniS, A003

From 18:30 Women Scholars Network F021

Tuesday, 19 June

9:00–10:30 Slot 4

S1-C: Multiple religious and secular identities in the public school III: Communication about religions and worldviews at school F021 S100: Normative concepts of plurality F-122 S102-A: The plurality of ritual practices I F023 S17: Religion in Sustainability Transitions: Empirical Insights F-105 S22-A: Religion and Revolution: Self-images, identity discourses, and the demarcation of religion and politics in nineteenth century Europe I F-106 S32-A: Identity, religion and resonance I F011 S34: Contested Religious Belongings in Europe. Membership, Practice and Identity in Comparative Perspective F-111 S54: New Age/ New Religiosities in non-Western context: Toward a comparative approach F-121 S6-B: Norms and Normativity in the Study of Religion II F-123 S65-A: Healing Narratives in Asian Religions: Interactions, Circulation, Legitimacy I F005 S69: Labeling religion: Migration and ascriptions of religious identities in contemporary Europe F-113 S72: Muslim Secularities: New Inquiries into Muslim Engagements with Religion, Politics and the Social F022 S73: Negotiations of Religious and Secular Gender Scripts in Womenʹs Conversions in Contemporary Western Europe F013 S74: Sacred Places and Multiple Religious Identities: Past and Present S78: How to foster peaceful coexistence of differing religious and secular perspectives: Results from latest empirical studies F006 S81: Multiple religious and maternal identities: othermothers, self-conceptions, conformity and nonconformity

10:30–11:00 ¤ Coffee Break ¤

11:00–12:00 Keynote 4: Jörg Rüpke Urbanity and multiple religious identities in antiquity UniS, A003

12:00–13:30 ¤ Lunch ¤

12:30–15:00 IAHR International Committee meeting F021

13:30–15:00 Slot 5S102-B: The plurality of ritual practices II F023 S22-B: Religion and Revolution: Self-images, identity discourses, and the demarcation of religion and politics in nineteenth century Europe II F-106 S31-A: Anchoring in a foreign land: How faith-based organisations accommodate refugees I F022 S32-B: Identity, religion and resonance II F011 S33: Debating, expressing and organizing non-belief among Muslims in Europe and the Middle East F-113 S59: Multiple belongings of German-speaking Muslims: Negotiating religious and secular identity positions F013 S62: The relationship between school education about religion and the academic discipline of the Study of Religions F-122 S65-B: Healing Narratives in Asian Religions: Interactions, Circulation, Legitimacy II F005 S87: Reflecting on Communal Identities – Comparing different Methods and Approaches in the Study of Religious Communities F-105 S99: Missionary activities and religious exclusiveness F-121

15:00–15:30 ¤ Coffee Break

15:30–17:30 EASR General Assembly F021 16:30–17:30 SGR General Assembly F013 17:30–19:30 Bern Tour From 19:30 Barbecue & Network Dance

Wednesday, 20 June

9:00–10:30 Slot 6 S13-A: Islam in European RE: a comparative perspective I F-105 S19-A: Regulating Religious Plurality I F-111 S29-A: The unseen forms of Russian Christian-ities I: Russian Protestantisms F011 S31-B: Anchoring in a foreign land: How faithbased organisations accommodate refugees II F022 S39-A: Where, who, what: The interrelation of religious identities with religious spaces and practices I F006 S51-A: National identities, secularization and sacralization of nature I F005 S60: Mountain Religion F013 S68-A: Indigenising movements in Europe I F023 S79-A: Young adults in a global perspective: a critical discussion of research on religion from the perspective of a mixed-method study of contemporary religiosities F-106 S83: Conversion Narrative F-113 S86: Deregulating European master narratives of diversity: fringes and mainstream in genealogical perspective F-123 S93-A: Self-conceptions and identity discourses: Indian traditions I F-122 S95-A: Self-conceptions and identity discourses within religious communities and traditions I F012 S98-A: Debates on orthodoxy and heterodoxy, conformity and non-conformity I: Gender and Magic F-112

10:30–11:00 ¤ Coffee Break ¤

11:00–12:00 Keynote 5: Dorothea Weltecke Religious demarcation, border violation and deviance discourses in medieval religious groups UniS, A003

13:30–15:00 Slot 7

S13-B: Islam in European RE: a comparative perspective II F-105 S19-B: Regulating Religious Plurality II F-111 S26: Religion, Art and Space F007 S29-B: The unseen forms of Russian Christianities II: Russian Orthodox minorities F011 S37: Plurality and Materiality F013 S51-B: National identities, secularization and sacralization of nature II F005 S57: Dance and religious identities F-107 S58-A: ‘Contemporary Spiritualities’ and ‘New Age’: Ethnographic and Historical-Comparative Approaches to a Transnational Field I: Concepts and terms F022 S68-B: Indigenising movements in Europe II F023 S70-A: From local interaction to globalized scandal: negotiating religious identities in a Swiss secondary school I F-113 S79-B: Young Adults and religion in a global perspective: socialization of religion and beyond F-106 S93-B: Self-conceptions and identity discourses: Indian traditions II F-122 S94: Religion and right-wing thinking – contemporary composites and constellations F006 S95-B: Self-conceptions and identity discourses within religious communities and traditions II F012 S98-B: Debates on orthodoxy and heterodoxy, conformity and non-conformity II: Society and Politics F-112

15:00–15:30 ¤ Coffee Break ¤

15:30–17:00 Slot 8

S21-A: Exploring Religion in Contemporary Urban India I F023 S23-A: Weakened, strengthened, enriched or unaffected? The (trans-)formation of religious identities under the conditions of interreligious contact I F-112 S29-C: The unseen forms of Russian Christianities III: Russian Orthodox practices F011 S3-A: Religious Normativity and multiplicity I F-121 S39-B: Where, who, what: The interrelation of religious identities with religious spaces and practices II F006 S44: Debating Form and Boundaries in Early Modern Catholic Pluralism: The Case of the Jesuits in Asia F005 S53-A: Beyond Nationalism and Religion: Cases of the Religious ‘Other’ I F-106 S58-B: ‘Contemporary Spiritualities’ and ‘New Age’: Ethnographic and Historical-Comparative Approaches to a Transnational Field II: Bodies and practices I F022 S61: Political Theology within the Study of Religion F-105 S67: Empirical studies of multiple religious identities around the world F021 S70-B: From local interaction to globalized scandal: negotiating religious identities in a Swiss secondary school II F-113 S85-A: Vernacular expressivity, tradition and institutional authority: ambiguities of belonging in vernacular religion I F-122 S9: Plurality in Ancient Mediterranean Religions F-111 S95-C: Self-conceptions and identity discourses within religious communities and traditions III F012

17:00–17:30 ¤ Coffee Break ¤

17:30–19:00 Slot 9

S10-A: Secular sensibilities & minority religious subjects I F-105 S21-B: Exploring Religion in Contemporary Urban India II F023 S23-B: Weakened, strengthened, enriched or unaffected? The (trans-)formation of religious identities under the conditions of interreligious contact II F-112 S24: Nomadic Line-of-flights in Religious Translocal Movements F011 S3-B: Religious Normativity and multiplicity II F-121 S30: Self-identity and Otherness: Shia Approaches to Religious Pluralism F012 S46: Religion of the individual / religion of the state F021 S49: Plurality of ritual practices and exegesis of rituals in Antiquity F-107 S53-B: Beyond Nationalism and Religion: Cases of the Religious ‘Other’ II F-106 S56: One, Many, and the City: Making and Unmaking Boundaries in Urban Religion F-113 S58-C: ‘Contemporary Spiritualities’ and ‘New Age’: Ethnographic and Historical-Comparative Approaches to a Transnational Field III: Bodies and practices II F022 S84: Multidisciplinary Understanding of Unbelief F-123 S85-B: Vernacular expressivity, tradition and institutional authority: ambiguities of belonging in vernacular religion II F-122 S90: “Moi, un Afropéen”: film as research – an audiovisual ethnography through sensational forms F005 S92-A: Self-conceptions, identity and Shiʹa tradition F006

Thursday, 21 June

9:00–10:30 Slot 10

S103-A: Secularity, secularities and forms of nonbelief I F021 S11-A: Space, Religion, and the Internet I F-121 S14: The marketization of religion: transnational and global developments F012 S25-A: Christians and the Dynamics of Religious Belonging in India: Looking Beyond Boundaries I F-112 S45: Religions and the sea F013 S47: Identity Discourses in the Religious Landscape of the Last Decades of the Russian Empire F011 S5-A: Esotericism and Eastern Christianities I: Traditionalism and Neo-Hesychasm F007 S52: Religious Identities, Media, and Communication F023 S55: Missionary Projects and Indigenous Responses in the Asia Pacific F-111 S66: Polish religious studies thought in the context of the 19th century culture studies F005 S77-A: The Highgate Cemetery in London: Diversity of Religious Practices in a Single Space I F-107 S88: Life reform networks in transnational context: c. 1900–c. 1970 F022 S92-B: Self-conceptions and identity discourses of Muslim traditions

10:30–11:00 ¤ Coffee Break ¤

11:00–12:00 Keynote 6: Eugen Ciurtin A Comparative History of saṃsāra in Early India: In and Out the Vortex of Transmigration UniS, A 003

12:00–13:30 ¤ Lunch ¤

13:30–15:00 Slot 11

S10-B: Secular sensibilities & minority religious subjects II F-105 S103-B: Secularity, secularities and forms of nonbelief II F021 S11-B: Space, Religion, and the Internet II F-121 S2: Religious identities in the making: Praxeological approaches to the study of religious identities in antiquity F-111 S25-B: Christians and the Dynamics of Religious Belonging in India: Looking Beyond Boundaries II F-112 S4: Death as a Process: Debating the Polyvalence of Chthonic Cults in Graeco-Roman Antiquity F012 S48: Varieties of Multiple Religious Identities – a summing-up conversation F023 S5-B: Esotericism and Eastern Christianities II: Language Games F007 S58-D: ‘Contemporary Spiritualities’ and ‘New Age’: Ethnographic and Historical-Comparative Approaches to a Transnational Field IV: Indigeneities, landscapes and media F022 S77-B: The Highgate Cemetery in London: Diversity of Religious Practices in a Single Space II

15:15–16:00 Closing Event vonRoll,

Contact

Stefan Nadile

e-mail: info@easr2018.org.

phone: +41 31 631 38 50

(Text by the organizers)

Link

http://www.easr2018.org/

University of Reading

PhD Colloquium on Late Antiquity

Description and Organization

Late Antiquity was once regarded as an age of decadence and barbarisation as well as a ‘marginal’ field of study. Those days are over. Late Antiquity has now its own place in academia and is considered a hot topic by both Classicists and historians of the Early Middle Ages, as well as scholars of religious studies, archaeology, art and philosophy in a fruitful exchange among disciplines.

The study of Late Antiquity involves a wide variety of disciplines. Our PhD Colloquium on Late Antiquity will take place at the University of Reading in May 4-5, 2018. The aim of our Colloquium is to make the most of such diversification by bringing together and achieving synergy among PhD Students from across the UK and abroad working on Late Antiquity.

Each paper (15 min) will be followed by a personalised response from a senior scholar (10 min) assigned by the organisers and a plenary discussion. Each delegate will circulate his or her paper a week in advance to his or her respondent.

Additionally, we will also host a poster session, with a £50 voucher prize for the best poster.

Lastly, the Colloquium will include a visit to the Ure Museum of Classical Archaeology of the University of Reading.

We welcome submissions of papers and/or posters from disciplines including (but not limited to) Greek and Latin Literature, History, Archaeology, Art, Philosophy and Theology:

Option Apapers (15 min)

Send an abstract of your paper (400 words) to readinglateantiquity@gmail.com by 1 November 2017. Please also specify your affiliation.
Option Bposters

Send a brief abstract (200 words) or outline of your poster to readinglateantiquity@gmail.com by 15 November 2017. Please also specify your affiliation.

Please note that, as the event is specifically aimed at PhD students, we can only accept submissions from PhD students. However, Masters students and early career researchers are warmly invited to attend and participate in the debates.

Contact

Lorenzo Livorsi (l.livorsi@pgr.reading.ac.uk)

Ilaria Scarponi (ilaria.scarponi@reading.ac.uk ) 

Fiona McMeekin (f.p.mcmeekin@pgr.reading.ac. uk)

(Text by the organizers)

Link

https://phdcolloquiumreading.wixsite.com/lateantiquity?fbclid=IwAR0QKJeHw3v-abAPqFuCBlmIOvpmQFFxQVlVTe7SYmk_zUDQFxwAXk5srCU

University of Bucharest

Theories of Divination in Late Antiquity and Byzantium

Description and organization

The present project concerns the debates over the nature of divination (μαντεία) in Late Antiquity and Early Byzantium (2nd-7th centuries). It proposes a new approach of late antique religious thought, based mostly on understudied Neoplatonic texts, highlighting their mutual interaction with Early Christian texts dealing with similar topics. The project develops a line of research already illustrated in our previous researches on the history of Platonic demonology and on the Neoplatonic theories of prayer. It is likely to contribute significantly to the knowledge of the understanding of traditional religious beliefs and practices in late antique philosophical milieus.

A first objective of the project is to define the role of oracular divination and oneiromancy in Late Neoplatonism (Iamblichus, Proclus, Damascius, Synesius). Another objective is to examine some central debates between Neoplatonist philosophers and Christian intellectuals on the nature of oracles and other types of divination, studying the cultural and religious contexts of such debates. A special investigation will be devoted to some aspects of the continuity between the theological understanding of divination in Late Neoplatonism (e.g., Proclus) and some Early Byzantine theories of prophetic inspiration (e.g., a less known homily of Pseudo-John Chrysostom).

The third objective of the project is to define the place of Artemidorus’ Oneirocriticon (2nd c.) in the context of philosophical and pseudo-scientific attempts to explain and to rationalise various divinatory practices. Specific comparisons will be established with Plutarch’s Delphic dialogues, with Plotinus’ physical and cosmological explanation of divination (in relation with astrology and magic) in Ennead III, 3 [48], 6, as well as with medical empiricism (e.g., Galenus).

Programme

  • Andrei TimotinLes récits pseudo-prophétiques à Byzance: une approche historique, at École d’été francophone de byzantinologie, Étudier le monde byzantin. Méthodologies et interprétations, 30 August – 5 September 2017, CEREFREA, Villa Noël, Bucharest;
  • Andrei Timotin, The Dream of Caesar Bardas (Nicetas the Paphlagonian, Vita Ignatii). Terminological, political and autobiographical aspects, at the First Annual Conference of the Romanian Society for Byzantine Studies, „N. Iorga” Institute for History, 16 November 2017;
  • Andrei Timotin, Divination et providence dans le néoplatonisme tardif, at the international Conference Theories of Divination in Late Antiquity and Byzantium, 17th-18th of November 2017, University of Bucharest;
  • Marilena Vlad, Damascius: la divination du principe et la silence de Platon, at the international Conference Theories of Divination in Late Antiquity and Byzantium, 17th-18th of November 2017, University of Bucharest;
  • Alina Tăriceanu, Elements of Prophetic Discourse in Valentinian Gnosticism, at the international Conference Theories of Divination in Late Antiquity and Byzantium, 17th-18th of November 2017, University of Bucharest;
  • Andrei Man, Chrysippus’ Περὶ μαντικῆς in Cicero’s De divinatione. Stoic Theories of Divination in Context , at the international Conference Theories of Divination in Late Antiquity and Byzantium, 17th-18th of November 2017, University of Bucharest.

Contact

Université de Bucarest

7-13, rue Pitar Moş, Bucarest

Institute for Philosophy “Al. Dragomir”

(Text by the organizers)

Link

https://institute.phenomenology.ro/project/2017-2019-theories-of-divination/

ISNS

16th Annual ISNS Conference

Description and organization

Call for panels for the 16th annual International Society for Neoplatonic Studies conference, to be held in Los Angeles on June 13-16, 2018, in conjunction with Loyola Marymount University.

Anyone interested in organizing a panel at the conference should send a brief description of the panel along with its title and the name(s) and email address(es) of the contact person(s) to the conference organizers:

Eric Perl: Eric.Perl@lmu.edu

David Albertson: dalberts@usc.edu

Marilynn Lawrence: pronoia12@gmail.com

John Finamore: john-finamore@uiowa.edu

Panel descriptions are due to us by January 22, 2018. I will email the list of proposed panels to the ISNS membership before February 5. Panel organizers are responsible for choosing and collecting abstracts for their panels. They should notify the organizers of their decisions by February 26. Abstracts should be no more than one page, single spaced.

We also welcome individual abstracts for papers that do not fall under any of the announced panels. Please send those abstracts (again, one-page maximum) to the four conference organizers above.

All abstracts, whether individual or for inclusion in panels, are due by February 26, 2018. Papers may be presented in English, Portuguese, French, German, Spanish, or Italian. It is recommended that those delivering papers in languages other than English provide printed copies to their audience at the conference.

Please note that anyone giving a paper at the conference must be a member of the ISNS. You may sign up and pay dues on the website of the Philosophy Documentation Center 

Note: If the page doesn’t show up, try pasting this address into your browser:
https://www.pdcnet.org/isns/International-Society-for-Neoplatonic-Studies-%28ISNS%29

Dues are $60.00 per year ($20.00 for students and retirees).

Participants may give only one paper at the conference and therefore should submit only one abstract.

Contact

Eric Perl: Eric.Perl@lmu.edu

David Albertson: dalberts@usc.edu

Marilynn Lawrence: pronoia12@gmail.com

John Finamore: john-finamore@uiowa.edu

(Text by the organizers)

Link

https://www.isns.us/conferences.html