The Idea of Semitic Monotheism

Stroumsa, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021

Description

The Idea of Semitic Monotheism examines some major aspects of the scholarly study of religion in the long nineteenth century–from the Enlightenment to the First World War. It aims to understand the new status of Judaism and Islam in the formative period of the new discipline. Guy G. Stroumsa focuses on the concept of Semitic monotheism, a concept developed by Ernest Renan around the mid-nineteenth century on the basis of the postulated and highly problematic contradistinction between Aryan and Semitic families of peoples, cultures, and religions. This contradistinction grew from the Western discovery of Sanskrit and its relationship with European languages, at the time of the Enlightenment and Romanticism. Together with the rise of scholarly Orientalism, this discovery offered new perspectives on the East, as a consequence of which the Near East was demoted from its traditional status as the locus of the Biblical revelations.

This innovative work studies a central issue in the modern study of religion. Doing so, however, it emphasizes the new dualistic taxonomy of religions had major consequences and sheds new light on the roots of European attitudes to Jews and Muslims in the twentieth century, up to the present day.

Table of contents

Introduction: The Study of Religion and the Spirit of Orientalism
1. Varieties of Monotheism and the Three Rings
2. The Enlightenment’s Paradigm Shift and the Three Impostors
3. Aryans, Semites, and Jewish Scholars
4. Cultural Transfers and Philologia orientalis
5. Semitic Monotheism: Renan on Judaism and Islam
6. A Jesus of White Marble or a Jesus in the Flesh?
7. Secular Scholarship in France: Catholics, Protestants, and Jews
8. From the Quarrel of Monotheism to the Babel-Bibel Controversy
9. Semitic Religion and Sacrificial Ritual
10. Sacrifice Compared: Israel and India
Conclusion: Comparing Monotheisms
Bibliography

(Text from the publisher)

Link

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-idea-of-semitic-monotheism-9780192898685?cc=br&lang=en&#

Foro di Studi Avanzati Gaetano Massa 2022

FSA Roma Annual Conference 2022

Philosophy, Theology, Aestetics, Religion from Antiquity to the Renaissance

Description and organization

7th annual conference of the Foro di Studi Avanzati Gaetano Massa 2022: Renaissance, Ancient, Medieval and Modern Patterns. Philosophy, Theology, Aestetics, Religion from Antiquity to the Renaissance. From 27th to 31st May 2022.

FSA Gateano Massa is a Network whose purpose is to provide an intellectual setting where scholars of philosophy, theology, religion and classics gather to share and compare their perspectives on the meaning and significance of their collective research

Programme

May 27 Friday: Foro di Alti Studi Gaetano Massa

16h00 Introduction

16h30 Presentation of FSA Academic Fellows

16h50 Presentation of FSA Arts Fellows

17h – 19h Light and Vision in Marsilio Ficino

19h Discussioon

May 28 Saturday: Foro di Alti Studi Riccardo Campa

9h – 9h45 Mapping Epistemologies I

9h45 Discussion

10h15 – 10h45 Mapping Epistemologies II

10h45 Discussion

11h – 12h30 Aesthetics of the Self

12h30 Discussion

13h Common Lunch, Casa Maria Immacolata

15h – 16h45 Aesthetics of the Self

16h45 Discussion

17h15 – 19h30 Mapping Mind

19h30 Discussion

May 29 Saturday: Foro di Alti Studi Patrick Atherton

9h – 9h45 Nous in the Greek Patres

9h45 Discussion

10h – 11h Plotinus’ Role in Shaping Augustine’s Conception of Mind

11h Discussion

11h30 – 12h30 Later Platonism and Gnosticism

12h30 Discussion

Lunch/Open

14h – 15h30 Thinking Causes: Fluxus I

15h30 Discussion

16h – 17h30 Thinking Causes: Fluxus II

17h30 Discussion

21h Concerto Sala Casella, Accademia Filarmonica Romana

May 30 Monday: Foro di Alti Studi John D. Turner

9h – 10h30 Roman Religions

10h30 Discussion

11h – 12h30 Rethinking Cusanus

12h30 Discussion

Lunch/Open

14h – 15h30 Varieties of English Platonism

15h30 Discussion

16h00 – 17h30 Justice and Fictions

17h30 Discussion

May 31 Tuesday: Foro di Alti Studi Jacob Neusner

9h – 10h30 Anabaseis and Katabaseis in Jung’s Psychology

10h30 Discussion

11h – 13h30 Knowledge: Cultural and Political Myths in the 19th and 20th Centuries

13h30 Discussion

14h Business Meeting

Contact

Robert Berchman – berchmanrob@earthlink.net

Eleonora Zeper – eleonora.zeper@gmail.com

Complete programm on the FSA’s Facebook page @FSAGaetanoMassa

Link

https://fsagaetanomassa.wordpress.com/

Dead See Scrolls Digital Library

Description

The Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) is very proud to present the Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library, a free online digitized virtual library of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Hundreds of manuscripts made up of thousands of fragments – discovered from 1947 and until the early 1960’s in the Judean Desert along the western shore of the Dead Sea – are now available to the public online. The high resolution images are extremely detailed and can be accessed through various search options on the site.

With the generous lead support of the Leon Levy Foundation and additional generous support of the Arcadia Fund, the Israel Antiquities Authority and Google joined forces to develop the most advanced imaging and web technologies to bring to the web hundreds of Dead Sea Scrolls images as well as specially developed supporting resources in a user-friendly platform intended for the public, students and scholars alike.

The launch of the Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library comes some 11 years after the completion of the publication of the Dead Sea Scrolls, initiated and sponsored by the IAA, and 65 years after the first scrolls were unearthed in the Caves of Qumran. This digital library is another example of the IAA’s vision and mission, to make these ancient texts freely available and accessible to people around the world. The Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library represents a new milestone in the annals of the story of one of the greatest manuscript finds of all times.

(Text by the organisers)

Link

https://www.deadseascrolls.org.il/about-the-project/a-note-from-the-iaa-director

CNRS – LEM, Université de Vienne, Université Laval et Université d’Amsterdam

Divination and Theurgy in Antiquity

Rencontre animée par Andrei Timotin (EPHE-LEM) et Crystal Addey (University College Cork)

Description et organisation

Quatrième rencontre du nouveau Webinaire « Les platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive: interactions philosophiques et religieuses (Platonisms of Late Antiquity: Philosophical and Religious Interactions).

Andrei Timotin (EPHE-LEM)
« Trois théories antiques de la divination : Plutarque,
Jamblique, Augustin. »

Crystal Addey (University College Cork)
« Platonic Philosopher-Priestesses and Female Theurgists. »

Le webinaire est organisé par Luciana G. Soares Santoprete, Anna van den Kerchove, George Karamanolis, Éric Crégheur et Dylan Burns.

La conférence aura lieu à 16h le vendredi 1 avril. Elle se déroulera en ligne.

N’hésitez pas à transmettre cette invitation à toute personne susceptible d’être intéressée par cette conférence ou toute autre conférence future sur les platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive.

Contact

Pour le lien zoom SVP envoyez un message à sympa@services.cnrs.fr ; écrivez dans l’objet du message : subscribe lesplatonismes. Laissez le corps du message vide. Vous allez recevoir un courrier de confirmation en retour.

Lien

https://lem-umr8584.cnrs.fr/?Actualites-84&lang=fr

CNRS – LEM, Université de Vienne, Université Laval et Université d’Amsterdam

Hermeticism, Mithraism and Neoplatonism

Description et organisation

Cinquième rencontre du nouveau Webinaire « Les platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive: interactions philosophiques et religieuses (Platonisms of Late Antiquity: Philosophical and Religious Interactions).

Rencontre animée par Christian Bull (Norwegian School of Theology) et Andreea-Maria Lemnaru-Carrez (Centre Léon Robin-CNRS).

Christian Bull (Norwegian School of Theology)
« The Hermetic Sciences in the Way of Hermes : Worldview
and Practices. »

Andreea-Maria Lemnaru-Carrez (Centre Léon Robin-CNRS)
« Mithra dans l’Antre des Nymphes de Porphyre. »

Le webinaire est organisé par Luciana G. Soares Santoprete, Anna van den Kerchove, George Karamanolis, Éric Crégheur et Dylan Burns.

La conférence aura lieu à 16h le mardi 10 mai. Elle se déroulera en ligne.

N’hésitez pas à transmettre cette invitation à toute personne susceptible d’être intéressée par cette conférence ou toute autre conférence future sur les platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive.

Contact

Pour le lien zoom SVP envoyez un message à sympa@services.cnrs.fr ; écrivez dans l’objet du message : subscribe lesplatonismes. Laissez le corps du message vide. Vous allez recevoir un courrier de confirmation en retour.

Lien

https://lem-umr8584.cnrs.fr/?Actualites-84&lang=fr

KU Leuven

Longing for Perfection.

Living the Perfect Life in Late Antiquity –

A Journey between Ideal and Reality

Description and organization

The project will offer a critical study of one of the most fundamental ideas of ancient Greek culture – the search for perfection. For centuries, not only philosophers and theologians, but also other intellectuals have reflected on what this ideal should consist in, devising ways of pursuing it in a wide range of human activities. The team will study the complex relationship between theory and praxis, and between ideal and reality, as found in pagan and Christian Greek literature from the first seven centuries CE. Methodologically, the project breaks new ground in going beyond longstanding and widespread (though mostly unjustified) presuppositions in scholarly literature, such as the dichotomy between theory and praxis or the opposition between the pagan and the Christian tradition in this regard. The team has set two main goals: the production (1) of a comprehensive study of the different aspects of ancient ideals of perfection and (2) of a number of in-depth studies of specific problems and core issues related to the overall topic.

Contact

Geert Roskam, Greek Studies Department

Blijde-Inkomststraat 21 – box 3309

3000 Leuven

thiasos@kuleuven.be
seriesgraeca@kuleuven.be

(Text by the organizers)

Link

https://www.kuleuven.be/onderzoek/portaal/#/projecten/3H170345?lang=en&hl=en

Measures of Wisdom

The Cosmic Dance in Classical and Christian Antiquity

Miller, James. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1986

Description

‘The interpretours of Plato,’ wrote Sir Thomas Elyot in The Governour (1531), ‘do think that the wonderful and incomprehensible order of the celestial bodies, I mean sterres and planettes, and their motions harmonicall, gave to them that intensifly and by the deepe serche of raison beholde their coursis, in the sondrye diversities of number and tyme, a forme of imitation of a semblable motion, which they called daunsigne or sltation.’

The image of the planets and stars engaged in an ordered and measured dance is an ancient one. Plato articulated it in a passage in the Timaeus, where he likened the apparent motions of the planets and stars to ‘choreiai’ (choral dances). Through the centuries the analogy has challenged Plato’s interpreters to define and elaborate the image.

Miller has examined a range of poetic and philosophical texts influenced by Plato cosmology, and has discovered frequent comparisons of the cosmic order to ‘daunsigne.’ He suggests that the vision of the cosmic dance did not develop at random in Western intellectual history but originated in a specific philosophical context and passed through stages of evolution that reflect Gnostic, Christian, Stoic, and Neoplatonic responses to Plato. He argues that the historical variations of the image were often closely related to adaption or criticisms of Plato’s theories of visual perception and intellectual vision.

The dance, in conjunction with images such as the Great chain of Being and the Lyre of the Heavens, became the dominant image of a peculiarly Late Antique world-view which Miller (after Augustine) has called the ‘poetic universe’; a world where metaphors, metonymies, and personifications could exist in fact as well as in word.

The result of Miller’s analysis is vast in scope. The nine chapters of the book each present a thesis on a particular author, but all function together like links in a chain. Miller has been described as ‘an historian of visions’; the book has been likened to Auerbach’s Mimesis. It is a remarkable contribution to an understanding of the complex interaction of ideas and images in time.

(Text from the publisher)

Link

https://utorontopress.com/9781487578497/measures-of-wisdom/

BCNH

La Bibliothèque Copte de Nag Hammadi

Lancée en 1974 à l’Université Laval (Québec, Canada), l’édition de la Bibliothèque copte de Nag Hammadi (BCNH) est la seule initiative francophone d’envergure consacrée à ces manuscrits; son but est de produire de ces textes des éditions critiques accompagnées de traductions françaises et de commentaires explicatifs. Conservés au Musée copte du Vieux Caire, les manuscrits sont accessibles par le truchement d’une édition photographique patronnée par l’UNESCO et le service des antiquités de la République Arabe d’Égypte. Cette publication photographique, qui reproduit les feuillets de papyrus tels quels, rend les textes accessibles aux spécialistes et sert de base ensuite aux éditions critiques, qui reconstruisent dans la mesure du possible les lacunes des manuscrits, pour ensuite donner lieu à des traductions, à des analyses philologiques et à des commentaires explicatifs. C’est à cette entreprise d’édition critique, de traduction française et d’analyse, que s’attaquèrent à l’Université Laval en 1974 les regrettés Jacques É. Ménard et Hervé Gagné, entourés de jeunes chercheurs québécois et étrangers. Deux entreprises analogues avaient été lancées quelques années auparavant, l’une à Berlin par le Berliner Arbeitskreis für koptisch-gnostische Schriften, l’autre à l’Institute for Antiquity and Christianity de Claremont (CA). Le noyau de l’équipe lavalloise compte plusieurs chercheurs qui forment le coeur d’un réseau comptant plusieurs collaborateurs canadiens et étrangers. Près d’une trentaine de chercheurs québécois et étrangers auront contribué à l’entreprise lavalloise au moment de son achèvement. Fondée en 1977 par les professeurs Jacques É. Ménard de l’Université des Sciences humaines de Strasbourg, Hervé Gagné et Michel Roberge de l’Université Laval, la Bibliothèque copte de Nag Hammadi est placée maintenant sous la direction d’Eric Crégheur, en collaboration avec Wolf-Peter Funk, Louis Painchaud et Paul-Hubert Poirier. Le comité d’édition est formé en outre de Bernard Barc, Régine Charron, Jean-Pierre Mahé, Anne Pasquier et Michel Roberge. Elle comporte trois sections, une section « Textes », une section « Concordances » et une section « Études ». Elle fut éditée conjointement par les Presses de l’Université Laval (Québec) et les Éditions Peeters (Louvain-Paris) jusqu’aux volumes 38 de la série « Textes », 7 de la série « Concordance » et 9 de la série « Études ». Pour tous les volumes suivants, Peeters est le seul éditeur.

Parallèlement à l’achèvement de cette collection destinée aux savants, l’équipe a publié en 2007 dans la Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, chez Gallimard, une reprise intégrale de ces traductions, qui ont toutes été révisées, en un seul volume qui rend enfin ces textes accessibles à un public francophone plus large, à travers la collection la plus prestigieuse de l’édition française.

La langue de publication est le français, mais certaines parties de volumes de la section « Textes » ou même des volumes entiers dans la section «Études» sont en anglais. On peut se procurer les volumes de la BCNH en commandant directement par la poste ou par téléphone aux Presses de l’Université Laval. Pour l’Europe, la diffusion est assurée par les Éditions Peeters. Pour se procurer les titres postérieurs aux volumes 38 de la série « Textes », 7 de la série « Concordance » et 9 de la série « Études », veuillez vous adresser aux Éditions Peeters.

(Texte des éditeurs)

Lien

https://www.naghammadi.org/bcnh

Études augustiniennes (EAA)

La Collection des Études augustiniennes, Série Antiquité (EAA), fondée en 1954 par F. Cayré et G. Folliet, riche de plus de 190 volumes, reflète les centres d’intérêt de l’Institut d’Études augustiniennes. Elle comprend des ouvrages d’érudition qui traitent prioritairement de saint Augustin, son œuvre et sa pensée, mais aussi, plus généralement, de la littérature chrétienne de l’Antiquité, de l’histoire de l’Antiquité tardive et de l’histoire des idées chrétiennes. Accompagnés d’un riche appareil de notes et d’index, fondés sur une connaissance approfondie de la bibliographie savante et sur les dernières découvertes de la recherche, les livres de la Collection constituent de solides monographies pour étudier l’Antiquité tardive sous ses différents aspects. Le fonds de la Collection comporte un nombre important d’ouvrages signés par de grands savants qui ont marqué la science française et internationale, comme René Braun, Pierre Courcelle, Pierre Hadot, Goulven Madec, Jean Pépin, etc. Sensible à l’évolution des modalités de la recherche contemporaine, la Collection publie également des ouvrages collectifs issus de rencontres scientifiques internationales. Les livres publiés dans la Collection sont, pour la grande majorité, écrits en français, mais la Collection n’exclut pas les études rédigées dans les langues de la communication scientifique internationale.

La Collection des Études augustiniennes, Série Antiquité, est dirigée par Frédéric Chapot, professeur à l’Université de Strasbourg, entouré d’un conseil scientifique comprenant Nicole Bériou (Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes, Paris), Marie-Odile Boulnois (École pratique des Hautes Études, Sciences religieuses), Anne-Isabelle Bouton-Touboulic (Université Charles de Gaulle – Lille 3), François Dolbeau (École pratique des Hautes Études, IVe section), Cédric Giraud (Université de Lorraine), Michel-Yves Perrin (École pratique des Hautes Études, Sciences religieuses), Pierre Petitmengin (École Normale Supérieure, Paris) et Vincent Zarini (Paris-Sorbonne, Paris IV).

Lien: http://www.etudes-augustiniennes.paris-sorbonne.fr/collection-des-etudes?lang=fr