ISNS Collections

Essay collections published in association with the International Society for Neoplatonic Studies. We have seven anthologies published in association with the ISNS – click on the title for details of each: Metaphysical Patterns in Platonism, Platonic Traditions in American Thought, Platonic Inquiries, Platonic Pathways, Platonism and its Legacy, Platonic Interpretations, Plato in Late Antiquity, the Middle Ages and Modern Times.

(Text by the editors)

Link

https://www.prometheustrust.co.uk/html/collections_from_the_isns.html#PlatInt

Plotinus IV 7 (2) : On the Immortality of the Soul

Studies on the Text and its Contexts

Lorenzo Ferroni, Daniela Taormina (eds.), Baden-Baden: Academia Verlag, 2022

Description

The Enneadic Treatise IV 7 (2) constitutes Plotinus’ first attempt to reflect systematically on the problem of the immortality of the soul. It is a complex text, in which the exposition of the Plotinian doctrine is preceded by a long doxographic excursus dedicated to the refutation of the ideas of some ancient philosophical schools (Aristotelian, Epicurean, Stoic, Pythagorean). The problems posed by the treatise are addressed in this volume from an interdisciplinary perspective: historians of ancient thought and of Neoplatonism, historians of religions, historians of late antique culture, classical philologists meet in these pages to address, from very different points of view, one of the most stimulating texts left to us by Plotinus.

(Text from the publisher)

Link

https://www.nomos-shop.de/academia/titel/plotinus-iv-7-2-on-the-immortality-of-the-soul-id-100251/

IMS-FORTH

Between Athens & Alexandria

Description and organization

“Between Athens & Alexandria” studies the relationship between the Neoplatonic Schools of Athens and Alexandria as well as the Alexandrian origins of Neoplatonism, with a special focus on later Neoplatonic developments on, and criticisms to, Plotinus (204/5-270). Are the Schools of Athens and Alexandria essentially distinct, as the traditional view suggests, or can their differences be reduced to the organisation of teaching? To what extent does the attitude towards theurgy (originally flourishing in the Neoplatonic School of Syria founded by Iamblichus of Chalcis) define the orientation of the Schools? Can the harmonization of Plato and Aristotle “bridge the gap” between Athens and Alexandria? The driving research hypothesis of the project is that the Neoplatonic Schools of Athens and Alexandria are essentially one School adapting itself to the different environments of the two cities. The view according to which the attitude towards theurgy constitutes the main difference between Athenian Neoplatonism, traditionally considered as following Iamblichus’ purportedly anti-intellectualist lead, and Alexandrian Neoplatonism, often regarded as “Porphyrian”, is put into question. Porphyry (c. 234-305) and Iamblichus (c. 245-325), and their respective followers in the 4th century, seem to have more in common than has been thought until now. Porphyrian and Iamblichaean trends are present in both Athens and Alexandria. Plotinus’ synthesis of Platonism with Aristotelian and Stoic elements is dynamic, and continues to incorporate innovation into tradition beyond the boundaries of Antiquity, and even of philosophy itself. Focusing on Athens and Alexandria, the project aims at investigating the wider network of late antique Neoplatonic Schools in the Eastern Mediterranean as well as this network’s legacy in the Arabic and Byzantine worlds. Studying late ancient Neoplatonism from the point of its Byzantine and Arabic receptions may reveal a much more unitary picture of the final phase of ancient philosophy than previous reconstructions suggest. The project is hosted by the Institute for Mediterranean Studies of the Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (IMS-FORTH) in collaboration with the Alexandria Center for Hellenistic Studies (ACHS) of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina. It is supported by the A. S. Onassis Foundation.

Link

https://athens-alexandria.ims.forth.gr/

KU Leuven

Leuven Colloquia on Ancient Platonism (LCAP)

Description and organization

The Leuven Colloquia on Ancient Platonism (LCAP) is a lecture series on the history of ancient Platonism (from the Early Academy to Late Antiquity), traditionally an important field of study in Leuven. These lectures will be held on a monthly basis, starting in January 2022, hosted by the KU Leuven Institute of Philosophy and De Wulf-Mansion Centre for Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy and will be given by leading specialists in the history of Platonism. Each year the general theme will be narrowed down through the selection of a specific topic on which the invitees will be asked to speak. For the academic year 2021/2022 (second term only) and 2022/2023 the chosen topic is ‘principle’ (archê).

4-6 pm, Kardinaal Mercierzaal.

All sessions will be accessible also remotely. For both in-person and remote participation, registration on Zoom is necessary. We will send out individual announcements for each talk, with the relevant Zoom link for registration.

Programme

17 October, Charlotte Murgier (Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne): Principles of practical knowledge: Aristotle’s discussion with Plato

14 November, Wiebke Marie-Stock (Bonn/Notre Dame): Turn the mirror of your soul. Plotinus on how to affect memory

Contact

lcap@kuleuven.be​​​​​​

Link

https://hiw.kuleuven.be/dwmc/research/not-another-history-of-platonism/events/LCAP

Plotino

Aldo Magris, Brescia: Scholé, 2022

Descrizione

Un’analisi del pensiero di Plotino, partendo dall’ambiente storico-religioso e filosofico nel quale visse, alla luce del rapporto con il platonismo e con lo gnosticismo. Con talento speculativo, Plotino riflette sul sistema dell’Assoluto – in cui la derivazione dal principio, l’Uno, va intesa come una generazione di immagini –, sull’essere umano, la libertà, il destino e la religiosità. Un’esposizione complessiva della filosofia di uno dei più importanti pensatori dell’antichità, che fa luce anche sulle sue somiglianze con la tradizione indiana e la sua persistenza nel pensiero occidentale.

Aldo Magris è professore di Filosofia teoretica all’Università di Trieste. Tra le sue pubblicazioni nel catalogo Morcelliana: La logica del pensiero gnostico (2012 2ed.); Destino, provvidenza, predestinazione. Dal mondo antico al cristianesimo (20162); Itinerari della filosofia e delle religioni (2 voll., 2017); Le invenzioni di Dio (2019). Ha inoltre curato i volumi: Trattati antichi sul destino (2009); Confutazione di tutte le eresie di Ippolito (20162).

Sommario

INTRODUZIONE

Premessa, 7

LA TRADIZIONE PLATONICA, 9

L’AMBIENTE RELIGIOSO, 40

CAPITOLO I LA VITA

CAPITOLO II LE OPERE

CAPITOLO III IL PENSIERO FILOSOFICO

IL SISTEMA DELL’ASSOLUTO, 115

ALLA RICERCA DEL SOGGETTO UMANO, 147

LIBERTÀ E DESTINO, 171

LA RELIGIOSITÀ PLOTINIANA, 198

CAPITOLO IV LA CRITICA

CAPITOLO V NOTA BIBLIOGRAFICA

Link

https://www.morcelliana.net/profili-filosofia/4455-magris-plotino-9788828404323.html

Ennead II.4: On Matter

A. A. Long, Las Vegas: Parmenides Publishing, 2022

Description

In Ennead II.4 Plotinus investigates the question of what underlies the forms that constitute the contents of our minds and senses. Aristotle had called this substrate « matter, » and Stoic philosophers followed suit. With a critical review of their notions, and reference to Plato’s so-called Receptacle, Plotinus develops an account of matter that makes it a supremely negative entity. How he describes the indescribable, and how he justifies incorporeal matter’s indispensability to bodies, are highlights of this tenaciously argued essay.

A. A. Long translates and interprets Plotinus’ treatise on the matter that underlies all physical and intelligible beings. With a wide-ranging introduction and probing analysis of details, he explains the intricate structure of the text. The book will appeal to everyone interested in the history of Platonism and ancient Greek theories of the world’s ultimate principles.

(Text from the publisher)

Link

https://www.eurospanbookstore.com/book/detail/plotinus-ennead-ii4/?k=9781733535762

LEM/ EPHE

Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité Tardive

Mai 2023

Description et organisation

Vendredi 26 mai 2023, 16h-18h15, via Zoom.

La vie intellectuelle de la fin de l’Antiquité est caractérisée par un fort intérêt porté aux « principes » (archai) : principes de la réalité, principes du monde, principes de la connaissance. Quelle que soit la façon dont on regroupe les intellectuels de la fin de l’Antiquité – polythéistes ou chrétiens, philosophes ou théologiens −, tous parlent, explicitement ou implicitement, des principes. Certains cherchent même activement à déterminer ce que sont les principes (par ex., Origène, Plotin, Porphyre, Damascius, les gnostiques, les Hermétistes, les théurgistes). Cette recherche est pour eux capitale, afin d’établir la manière dont la réalité est structurée, de réfléchir à la place des êtres humains dans le monde et aux puissances qui affectent leur vie, de penser dans quelle mesure nous sommes libres, comment nous pouvons atteindre la connaissance, ainsi qu’obtenir le bonheur ou le salut. La recherche des principes (métaphysiques ou théologiques) est ainsi un thème important en lui-même et pour la formation éthique. Le Programme des rencontres 2022-2023 du projet de recherche Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive propose d’explorer cette thématique des « principes » (archai) dans le monde intellectuel de la fin de l’Antiquité. Il examinera différentes questions, telles que : comment les principes disent la réalité, comment ils expliquent les relations entre les mondes divin et humain et dans quelle mesure le bonheur et le salut sont possibles pour les humains étant donné la structure de la réalité.

Programme

Is Matter a Principle? Christian Authors from Hermogenes to Origen

Lenka Karfikova (Charles University Prague) :

Our study attempts to map the ideas of matter in the Christian authors of the 2nd- 3rd centuries (Hermogenes, Tatian, Theophilus of Antioch, Clement of Alexandria, Origen), which by no means included only the idea of “creation out of nothing” as it eventually became established for a long time.

The Critique of the Chaldean Oracles in the Anonymous Commentary on Plato’s ‘Parmenides’

Stefan Marinca (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) :

The so-called Anonymous Commentary on Plato’s ‘Parmenides’ often shows a strong polemical spirit. This applies especially to the fourth fragment of the Commentary (fol. IX–X) where the possibility of knowing the First Principle is debated, questioning at least two schools of thought: on the one hand, the Stoics and on the other hand, an “unnamed group of interpreters” of the Chaldean Oracles. My presentation examines the passage that recalls the Chaldean Oracles from two perspectives. After reviewing some hypotheses about the identity of these “unnamed interpreters” and the originality of their thesis, I will turn to the response of the commentator, who criticizes both the form of their transmission (by means of a revelation) and the doctrine itself. The second point of view is related to a formal and objective matter: the “unnamed interpreters” of the Oracles claim that the Father “unifies in his simplicity” his own Power and Intellect. This phrase is also found in the ‘common source’ used by the Latin theologian Marius Victorinus and the Coptic-Gnostic apocalypse Zostrianos (NHC VIII,1), although here it indicates how the One is configured according to the triad Existence-Life-Blessedness. The final part of my presentation examines some hypotheses concerning the presence of this formula in both the Anonymous Commentary and the ‘common source’, by making some references to the anti-Gnostic debate promoted by the school of Plotinus.

Contact

Projet pluriannel de recherches dirigé par Luciana Soares Santoprete, Anna Van den Kerchove, George Karamanolis, Éric Crégheur et Dylan Burns.

The zoom link for each conference will be sent the week before to all those who have already registered last year.

For those who are not yet in our mailing list, to receive the zoom link of the conferences, please send a message to sympa@services.cnrs.fr from the address you want to subscribe to the list.

In the subject line of your message, type in: subscribe lesplatonismes

Leave the message body blank. You will receive a confirmation e-mail.

Lien

https://cnrs.academia.edu/LucianaGabrielaSoaresSantoprete

https://lem-umr8584.cnrs.fr/?Luciana-Gabriela-Soares-Santoprete

LEM/ EPHE

Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité Tardive

Avril 2023

Description et organisation

Vendredi 14 avril 2023, 16h-18h15, via Zoom.

La vie intellectuelle de la fin de l’Antiquité est caractérisée par un fort intérêt porté aux « principes » (archai) : principes de la réalité, principes du monde, principes de la connaissance. Quelle que soit la façon dont on regroupe les intellectuels de la fin de l’Antiquité – polythéistes ou chrétiens, philosophes ou théologiens −, tous parlent, explicitement ou implicitement, des principes. Certains cherchent même activement à déterminer ce que sont les principes (par ex., Origène, Plotin, Porphyre, Damascius, les gnostiques, les Hermétistes, les théurgistes). Cette recherche est pour eux capitale, afin d’établir la manière dont la réalité est structurée, de réfléchir à la place des êtres humains dans le monde et aux puissances qui affectent leur vie, de penser dans quelle mesure nous sommes libres, comment nous pouvons atteindre la connaissance, ainsi qu’obtenir le bonheur ou le salut. La recherche des principes (métaphysiques ou théologiques) est ainsi un thème important en lui-même et pour la formation éthique. Le Programme des rencontres 2022-2023 du projet de recherche Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive propose d’explorer cette thématique des « principes » (archai) dans le monde intellectuel de la fin de l’Antiquité. Il examinera différentes questions, telles que : comment les principes disent la réalité, comment ils expliquent les relations entre les mondes divin et humain et dans quelle mesure le bonheur et le salut sont possibles pour les humains étant donné la structure de la réalité.

Programme

Middle Platonic Theories of Principles and the Valentinian Grande Notice in Irenaeus of Lyon

Christoph Markschies (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin – Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften) :

In Irenaeus’ Adversus Haereses an extoteric sketch of a group of so called “Valentinian Gnostics” is preserved, probably not written by Ptolemy, a freelanced Christian teacher in Rome, but by one or some of his pupils. This sketch contains a theory of principles (in the form of a myth which one can compare to myths in Platonic texts. After having discussed the question which esoteric theory of principles is behind the esoteric myth we will discuss the question how this “Valentinian” theory of principles is related to contemporary Middle Platonic theories. We will observe a certain tendency of these Christians to demonstrate their independence and at the same time an interest to recognized by Platonists as part of a contemporary dialogue on principals.

Harmonics, Theurgy and Syncretism in the De Nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii of Martianus Capella

Jay Bregman (University of Maine) 

In his Neoplatonic allegory of the ascent of the human soul to the noetic realm, The Marriage of Philology and Mercury, Martianus Capella follows the polyvalent allegorical principles of Porphyry and the Theurgic Neoplatonists for whom gods and myths, disturbing on the surface, esoterically represent noetic forms and processes. Mercury and Philology symbolize the divine and human intellect and their marriage. Martianus uniquely applies Greek harmonic principles and intervals to the steps of Philology’s ascent through the spheres. The “natural music” in the
grove of Apollo suggests the theurgic presence of the god. Harmony’s discourse on Greek music covers the modes and categories of Greek music. Martianus allegorical principles accord with the emperor Julian’s theology. His use of musical principles displays his grasp of theurgic and harmonic principles.

Contact

Projet pluriannuel de recherches dirigé par Luciana Soares Santoprete, Anna Van den Kerchove, George Karamanolis, Éric Crégheur et Dylan Burns.

The zoom link for each conference will be sent the week before to all those who have already registered last year. For those who are not yet in our mailing list, to receive the zoom link of the conferences, please send a message to sympa@services.cnrs.fr from the address you want to subscribe to the list. In the subject line of your message, type in: subscribe lesplatonismes. Leave the message body blank. You will receive a confirmation e-mail.

Lien

https://cnrs.academia.edu/LucianaGabrielaSoaresSantoprete

https://lem-umr8584.cnrs.fr/?Luciana-Gabriela-Soares-Santoprete

LEM/ EPHE

Les platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive

Février 2023

 

Description et organisation

Vendredi 10 février 2023, 16h-18h15, via Zoom.

La vie intellectuelle de la fin de l’Antiquité est caractérisée par un fort intérêt porté aux « principes » (archai) : principes de la réalité, principes du monde, principes de la connaissance. Quelle que soit la façon dont on regroupe les intellectuels de la fin de l’Antiquité – polythéistes ou chrétiens, philosophes ou théologiens −, tous parlent, explicitement ou implicitement, des principes. Certains cherchent même activement à déterminer ce que sont les principes (par ex., Origène, Plotin, Porphyre, Damascius, les gnostiques, les Hermétistes, les théurgistes). Cette recherche est pour eux capitale, afin d’établir la manière dont la réalité est structurée, de réfléchir à la place des êtres humains dans le monde et aux puissances qui affectent leur vie, de penser dans quelle mesure nous sommes libres, comment nous pouvons atteindre la connaissance, ainsi qu’obtenir le bonheur ou le salut. La recherche des principes (métaphysiques ou théologiques) est ainsi un thème important en lui-même et pour la formation éthique. Le Programme des rencontres 2022-2023 du projet de recherche Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive propose d’explorer cette thématique des « principes » (archai) dans le monde intellectuel de la fin de l’Antiquité. Il examinera différentes questions, telles que : comment les principes disent la réalité, comment ils expliquent les relations entre les mondes divin et humain et dans quelle mesure le bonheur et le salut sont possibles pour les humains étant donné la structure de la réalité.

Programme

Principia in the Rhetoric, Biblical Exegesis, and Trinitarian Theology of Marius Victorinus

Stephen Cooper (Franklin & Marshall College) 

The surviving writings of Marius Victorinus, both those covering the areas of his professional pre-Christian activity as a rhetor as well his post-conversion works, all mention the principia of the objects of his authorial concerns: rhetoric, dialectic, theology, and the Christian life. While it is with slight exception only his trinitarian treatises that explicitly discuss principia in the ontological or metaphysical sense, all of his works show a distinct inclination to express what comes first — in argumentation, in knowledge, and in reality — as a necessary step to grasping the consequences relative to each sphere of inquiry or action. This paper will survey his writings for their various usages of the term principium (and related vocabulary), with the goal of ascertaining how his articulation of the principia of rhetoric, dialectical argumentation, trinitarian theology, and Christian ethics reveals his philosophical sources, his theological commitments, and his aims as an author.

Le nombre comme ἀρχή dans le monde latin des IV– Ve siècles

Beatrice Bakhouche (Université de Montpellier) :
Ἀρχή est généralement rendu en latin par les termes initium ou principium, qui peuvent recouvrir des réalités fort différentes. Le nombre en est l’une d’elles et sa déclinaison, sur le plan philosophique comme religieux, est plus fréquente qu’on ne pourrait le croire, car les grands auteurs des IVe-Ve siècles en font tous état. Je me propose d’aborder, dans le cadre de cette communication, les passages les plus significatifs d’auteurs comme Calcidius, Macrobe, Martianus Capella ou Favonius Eulogius, en essayant d’en dégager le sens, les nuances d’un auteur à l’autre et, s’il se peut, l’origine.

Contact

Projet pluriannel de recherches dirigé par Luciana Gabriela Soares Santoprete, Anna Van den Kerchove, George Karamanolis, Éric Crégheur et Dylan Burns.

The zoom link for each conference will be sent the week before to all those who have already registered last year.
For those who are not yet in our mailing list, to receive the zoom link of the conferences, please send a message to sympa@services.cnrs.fr from the address you want to subscribe to the list. In the subject line of your message, type in: subscribe lesplatonismes. Leave the message body blank. You will receive a confirmation e-mail.

Lien

https://platonismes.huma-num.fr

https://cnrs.academia.edu/LucianaGabrielaSoaresSantoprete

https://lem-umr8584.cnrs.fr/?Luciana-Gabriela-Soares-Santoprete

LEM/ EPHE

Les platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive

Décembre 2022

Description et organisation

Vendredi, 9 décembre 2022, 9h-11h15, via Zoom.

La vie intellectuelle de la fin de l’Antiquité est caractérisée par un fort intérêt porté aux « principes » (archai) : principes de la réalité, principes du monde, principes de la connaissance. Quelle que soit la façon dont on regroupe les intellectuels de la fin de l’Antiquité – polythéistes ou chrétiens, philosophes ou théologiens −, tous parlent, explicitement ou implicitement, des principes. Certains cherchent même activement à déterminer ce que sont les principes (par ex., Origène, Plotin, Porphyre, Damascius, les gnostiques, les Hermétistes, les théurgistes). Cette recherche est pour eux capitale, afin d’établir la manière dont la réalité est structurée, de réfléchir à la place des êtres humains dans le monde et aux puissances qui affectent leur vie, de penser dans quelle mesure nous sommes libres, comment nous pouvons atteindre la connaissance, ainsi qu’obtenir le bonheur ou le salut. La recherche des principes (métaphysiques ou théologiques) est ainsi un thème important en lui-même et pour la formation éthique. Le Programme des rencontres 2022-2023 du projet de recherche Les Platonismes de l’Antiquité tardive propose d’explorer cette thématique des « principes » (archai) dans le monde intellectuel de la fin de l’Antiquité. Il examinera différentes questions, telles que : comment les principes disent la réalité, comment ils expliquent les relations entre les mondes divin et humain et dans quelle mesure le bonheur et le salut sont possibles pour les humains étant donné la structure de la réalité.

Programme

Contesting the Three-Principle Systems of the Refutation of All Heresies (Elenchos)

David Litwa (Australian Catholic University)

Since the 1960s, scholars have been accustomed to categorize several groups of the Sondergut in the Refutation of All Heresies as “three-principle systems.” These groups include the Naassenes, Peratai, Simonians, Sethians, Doketai, and Monoimus. The purpose of this paper is to show how this classification generally reinscribes the heresiological tendencies of the author of the Refutation. I offer a fresh reading of these Sondergut sources with an eye to their variety and the specifics of their theology. In the end, although scholars can fruitfully speak of “principles” when referring to the theology of these groups, the principles were not always or even frequently triadic.

Une aporie contre les gnostiques ? La tension entre les principes éthico-cosmologiques chez Plotin et ses implications antignostiques

Camille Guigon (Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3) 

Dans les traités 6 (IV, 8) et 10 (V, 1), Plotin se confronte à un problème redoutable à la fois pour son système et pour la pensée platonicienne en général : l’âme vient-elle dans un corps pour une raison éthique ou pour une raison cosmologique ? Dans le cas de l’éthique, l’âme descend dans le corps car elle est incapable de maintenir sa contemplation des formes intelligibles. Mais dans le cas de la cosmologie, l’âme vient dans le sensible car elle doit animer les corps et faire naître les espèces vivantes déjà présentes dans l’intelligible. Si Platon ne traite pas ces questions, Plotin tente de les résoudre. Or, il ne parvient pas à atteindre son objectif. C’est dans le cadre de cet échec qu’interviennent ses adversaires gnostiques. Dans cette présentation, nous montrerons que les textes gnostiques qui nous sont parvenus, apportent des solutions efficaces à la tension entre les principes éthico-cosmologiques, ce que Plotin ne parvient pas à faire. Celui-ci va cependant riposter, en particulier dans le Traité 33 (II, 9), en faisant de cette tension, qu’il ne résout pas, une arme. Paradoxalement, c’est parce qu’il est bien plus respectueux de Platon que les gnostiques qu’il conserve l’aporie. Afin de démontrer comment Plotin a utilisé l’aporie éthico-cosmologique contre les gnostiques, nous montrerons d’abord qu’il a échoué à la résoudre. Puis nous donnerons un aperçu de la réponse gnostique à ce problème et enfin, nous verrons comment Plotin insère l’aporie dans son argumentation philosophique contre les gnostiques.

Contact

Projet pluriannel de recherches dirigé par Luciana Soares Santoprete, Anna Van den Kerchove, George Karamanolis, Éric Crégheur et Dylan Burns.

The zoom link for each conference will be sent the week before to all those who have already registered last year.

For those who are not yet in our mailing list, to receive the zoom link of the conferences, please send a message to sympa@services.cnrs.fr from the address you want to subscribe to the list.

In the subject line of your message, type in: subscribe lesplatonismes.

Leave the message body blank. You will receive a confirmation e-mail.

Lien

https://cnrs.academia.edu/LucianaGabrielaSoaresSantoprete

https://lem-umr8584.cnrs.fr/?Luciana-Gabriela-Soares-Santoprete