• Identifiant
    • FymDS7oD
  • Contenu de la note
  • The connection this passage has with the foregoing perhaps turns on σύνεστιν of line 29 which continues what was said before the Minos-scene, about being together with the SE (= Supreme Entity line ; 23 συνουσία) and the passage could aim to Neoplatonise the thought, as I suggested : the SE is with you. In any case it generalizes Minos’ case : the one is with all. Plotinus proceeds with dwelling on the position of people who do not know (οὐκ εἰδόσι). According to Plotinus people who ‘do not know’ have no awareness of the presence of the SE, because they, themselves, break away from the SE, or rather, they break away from themselves. One cannot catch what one is fleeing from and having lost oneself one cannot seek some one, likewise a child, when outside itself in an outburst of madness, will not recognize its father (note 656 : On the notion of father and child and their relation see, Ferwerda, Images, 78, who has interesting things to say about the return of the child to the father and makes a reference to Gnostics, who were familiar with the scene (l’enfant prodigue). I cannot understand what Ferwerda (ib., 79) means when he says that the image of the father never coincide “avec l’Un suprême”, which happens to be the case in our text). However, he, who knows who he is himself, will know his father and his origin (ὁπόθεν). To lose oneself is to lose the only channel to go to the SE (by epistrophè).

    Here, at the end of ch. 7, we meet with the theme of the descended soul, which dispersing itself in the world of genesis and dedicating itself to worldly affairs, ceases to be aware of its high origin (note 657 : See on the soul as originating in the Supreme Entity, 319) and its de facto connection with the Highest Entity. In this state of oblivion the soul is prey to mindlessness (ἐν ἀνοίαις), desires, fears and other evils, as we read in a rather early treatise, 6 (IV, 8), 3, 3 ff. At this point we have lost our ‘selves’ (αὐτούς). Locating this ‘self is really a serious problem in Plotinus’ psychology to which has been given a lot of attention by e.g. Blumenthal (note 658 : Blumenthal, Psychology, 109 ff.). In any case, one can lose it, as Plotinus points out at the end of ch.7. Unfortunately, Blumenthal does not take this loss of self into consideration nor does O’Daly (note 659 : In O’Daly, the Self we do not come across our passage). This form of loss of the self is entirely different from the loss of the self in the union with the SE (see below 310).

  • Remarques de l'éditeur
  • Luciana Santoprete
    • Contexte
    • Commentaire du Traité 9 (VI, 9), 7, 23-34
    • Page
    • 228
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  • Traité 9 (VI, 9), 7, 34 + Traité 6 (IV, 8), 3, 3