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    • A2iE3WZi
  • Contenu de la note
  • Here there appears the “cosmic religiosity” which Plotinus shared with other philosophers of late antiquity: the belief, that is, that the celestial regions and the heavenly bodies are divine and far closer to any higher, spiritual or intelligible, divinities there may be, than the world below the moon, and that consequently the primary and proper material abode of souls is in this higher region from which they descend, assuming progressively inferior sorts of bodies according to the depth of their descent, the earthly body being the last and lowest: cp. chs. 9 and 17 of this treatise and Appendix II, The Astral Body in Neoplatonism in Proclus, The Elements of Theology ed. E. R. Dodds, 2nd ed. (Oxford 1963) 313-21. Philosophical cosmic religion was something which Plotinus took seriously. He defends it vigorously against astrological superstition in II. 3 and against the Gnostic contempt for the divinities of the visible heaven in II. 9. But it occupies a place of moderate importance in his thought, and is not easy to reconcile with other aspects of it, and the idea of “astral” or “pneumatic” bodies superior to our earthly bodies is of much less important to him than the belief in the divinity of the heavenly bodies.

  • Remarques de l'éditeur
  • Luciana Santoprete
    • Contexte
    • Note 2 au Traité 27 (IV, 3), 15, 1-4
    • Page
    • 82-83
  • Sources modernes
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  • Mots-clefs français
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  • Liens
  • Appartenances
  • Traité 27 (IV, 3), 15, 4 + Traité 52 (II, 3) (entier) + Traité 33 (II, 9) (entier)