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    • fr3fOJCK
  • Contenu de la note
  • This early treatise, written in a style which suggests that it was intended for a comparatively wide circle of readers, is particularly interesting in a number of ways. It shows more clearly than any other work of Plotinus how conscious he was of the tension between the two sides of Plato’s thought about the material world and the human body, the pessimistic dualism most strikingly apparent in the Phaedo and the optimistic view of the physical universe as the good product of ungrudging divine goodness which all later Platonists found in the Timaeus ; and it shows how hard (even if never entirely successfully) he tried to reconcile them. The movement of his thought in the treatise is worth noticing, from the pessimistic and dualistic beginning to a view (in chapters 6 and 7) of the material world and of soul’s descent into body as positive and optimistic as anything in the Enneads. Read as a whole, the treatise is strong evidence against the view that there is a development in the thought of Plotinus from a pessimism about the material world with Gnostic affinities to a sane positive Hellenic view. The tension, and some never fully reconciled inconsistency, between the two sides of Platonism appears in his latest works as it does in this early one.

  • Remarques de l'éditeur
  • Luciana Santoprete
    • Contexte
    • Introduction au Traité 6 (IV, 8)
    • Page
    • 394
  • Sources modernes
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  • Sources anciennes
  • Mots-clefs français
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  • Liens
  • Appartenances
  • Traité 6 (IV, 8) (entier)